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Full text of "Constitution and playing rules of the National league and American association of professional base ball clubs"

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-^:1896 



CONSTITUTION 



AND 



PLAYING RULES 



OF THE 



RATIONAL bEAGUE 



AND 



AMERICAN /cSSOCIATION 



OF 



PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CL(]E>S. 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION. 



Published by A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

13«-130 Nass.u Street, New York. 147-1 W Wabash Avenue, Chicago, 

1218 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 



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CONSTITUTION 

OP THH 

National League and American Association 



Professional Base Ball Clubs. 

1896. 
J* 

NAME. 
SECTION I. (I) This Association shall be called THE Na- 

ii'ivu. League and American Association of Profes- 
sion w. Base Ball Clubs. 

OBJECTS. 

Sec. 2. The objects of this League are : 

(1) To perpetuate base ball as the National game of the 
United States, and to surround it with such safeguards as 
to warrant absolute public confidence in its integrity and 
methods. 

(2) To protect and promote the mutual interests of profes- 
sional base hall clubs and professional base ball players, and 

(3) To establish and regulate the base ball championship of 
the I fnited States. 

MEMBERSHIP. 
Sec. 3. This League shall consist of twelve clubs (the mem- 
bership of which shall not be increased or diminished for aperiod 
of ten ycurs) located in the following named cities, to wit : 
Boston, New York, Brooklyn, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Wash- 
ing , Pittsburg, Cincinnati, St. Louis, Louisville, Cleveland 

and Chicago, or such other clubs as may, from time to lime, lie 
1 to membership as may be hereinafter provided for, but 
in no event shall there be more than one club in any city. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM MEMBERSHIP. 
SEC. 4. Any club member of this League finding itself un- 
able to meet the obligations it has assumed shall have the 
right to ask the League for permission to dispose of its rights 
and franchises as a member of this League to some other city 



/ 



4 CONSTITUTION. 

or organization. In the event of this League giving its con- 
sent to the acceptance of such city or organization to member- 
ship, such club member shall be admitted to membership, 
providing said club shall assume, together with the rights and 
franchises of said retiring club, all (he liabilities, responsibili- 
ties and obligations entered into by said retiring club, as a 
member of this League. Provided, however, and it must be 
so understood by the retiring and the new member, that the 
retiring club shall not be relieved «r released from any con- 
tracts, responsibilities or obligations entered into by it to this 
League until all of said contracts, responsibilities and obliga- 
tions have been fully paid and determined by the club accept- 
ing its membership, rights, franchises, etc. 

ADMISSION TO MEMBERSHIP. 

SBC. 5. No club shall be admitted unless it shall first have 
delivered to the Secretary of the League a written application 
for membership, signed by its President and Secretary, accom- 
panied by documents showing that such club bears the name of 
the city in which it is located, and that it is regularly organ- 
ized and officered, and, where the State law permits it, chart- 
ered. Such application shall at once be transmitted by the 
Secretary to the Hoard of Directors, who shall immediately 
investigate and report upon said application, said report to be 
communicated to the League through the Secretary. 

SEC. 6. The voting upon an application for membership 
shall be by ballot, a three-fourths vote being requisite for 
election. 

IN REGARD TO VACANCIES. 

Sec. 7. In case a vacancy occurs in the membership of this 
organization during the championship season the President 
shall nominate to all the clubs all applicants fur membership, 
and the vote thereon may be taken by telegraph or mail, as 
occasion may require, and a majority of all tin- clubs will be 
required to admit any applicant to membership., Such mem- 
bership, however, shall continue only until tin- next annual 
meeting, but such club shall be subject to all the rules and 
requirements of this organization. 

TERMINATION OF MEMBERSHIP. 
Sec. 8. The membership <,f any clnb may be terminated — 

(1) By resignation duly accepted by a three-fourths vote of 
all the clubs in meeting duly convened, as provided in Section 4. 

(2) Failure to present its nine at the time and place agreed 
upon to play any championship game, uuless caused by un- 
avoidable accident in traveling. 



CONSTITUTION. 5 

(3) Allowing open betting or pool selling upon ils grounds or 
in any building owned or occupied by it. 

(4) Maying any game of ball with a club that is disqual 
or ineligible under this ConstitUl 

(5) Offering, agreeing, conspiring or attempting to lose any 
game of ball, or failing to immediately expel any player who 
shall be proven guilty of offering, agreeing, conspiring or 
attempting to lose any game of ball, or of being interested in 
any pool or wager thereon. 

(6) Disbandmenl of its organization or team during the 
champi ison. 

(7) Failing or refusing to fulfil ils contractual obligations. 

(8) Failing or refusing to comply with any lawful require- 
ment of the Hoard of Directors. 

(9) Wilfully violating any provision of this Constitution or 
the legislation or playing rules made in pursuance thereof, or 
any violation of the provisions of the National Agreement. 

THE EXPULSION OF CLUBS. 

Sec. q. To carry into effect the provisions of Section 8 of 
this Constitution, the facts in any case covered by such section 
must be reported to the Secretary of the League, who shall at 
once notify, by mail or telegraph, the party charged with the 
specified default or offense, inquiring whether any dispute 
exists as to the facts alleged. In case the facts art disputed, 
the Hoard shall, after due notice, try the case under such regu- 
lations as they may prescribe, and their finding shall be dual 
and conclusive on all parlies except in case of expulsion, when 
such finding shall be forwarded to each club, which shall trans- 
mit to the Secretary written ballots "For Expulsion" or 
" Against Expulsion "; and if all clubs vote " For Expulsion " 
the Secretary shall notify all clubs of the forfeiture of member- 
ship of the party charged. 

hi B5 AMi ASSESSMENTS, 

SEC. 10. (1) Each club shall pay to the Secretary on or before 
the first da\ oi April of each year the sum of fioo as annual 

dues; and such other sums as from time to time may be as- 
sessed for the payment of salaries of officers and umpires, and 
for such other expenses as may be incui >J this 

League or the Board of Directors. Also all fines and penalties 
imposed by said League or its Board of Directors upon a club 
or upon any club officer, player, manager, other em- 

ploye when so levied and imposed by virtue of and in accord- 
ance with the provisions of this Constitution and the playing 
rules of this League. 



6 CONSTITUTION. 

THE IMPOSING OF FINES. 

(2) Upon conviction of any of the offenses prescribed in Sec 
tion S, as causes for expulsion, the Board of Directors may, in 
the first instance, as a preliminary to, or in lieu of expulsion, 
impose such a line as is in their judgment commensurate with 
the injury; which fine may include a penally payable to any 
other club or clubs, as an equivalent for damages sustained for 
such violation of this Constitution, or of the legislation or con- 
tracts made in pursuance thereof. 



^^ 






Sec. ii. At its annual meeting the League shall elect a 
President, Secretary, Treasurer and Board of Directors. The 
President shall be ex-officio Chairman of the Board of Direct- 
ors, lie shall report to the Board of Directors any violations 
of the provisions of this Constitution that may come to his 
knowledge. He shall be the sole interpreter of the playing 
rules during the championship season. lie shall preside at all 
the meetings of the League, and at the annual meeting of the 
League shall act as a schedule committee. 

Should the office of President become vacant by death, resig- 
nation, or removal, the Board of Directors shall within thirty 
days elect a President. 

SEC. 12. The Board of Directors shall consist of the Presi- 
dent and six other members, to be chosen at the annual meeting 
by ballot, three of whom shall represent the Eastern clubs and 
three the Western clubs. 

QUALIFICATIONS OF OFFICERS. 

SEC. 13. No person shall be qualified to act as Director who 
is not an actual member of the club he represents, nor shall 
any club, under any circumstances, be represented by more 
than one person on the Board. 

I)UI IKS OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

SEC. 14. The Hoard shall have the general supervision and 
management of all affairs and business of the League, and 
shall be individually answerable to the League for the faithful 
discharge of their trust. 

SEC. 15. The Hoard shall meet annually on the morni ng of 

1 1 1 s'lay after the second Tuesday in November, 

at ') o'clock, at the place where the annual meeting of the 

League is to be held, but may bold special meetings whenever 

urgent necessity may require. 

SEC. 16. The Board shall prepare a detailed report of all 
their doings, and present the same in writing to the League at 



CONSTITUTION. 



its annua) meeting, which report shall, if accepted, be filed 
with the Secretary, together with all official papers, docu- 
ments and property, which may have come into their posses- 
sion l>y virtue (if their office. 

VACANCY in THE BO iRD. 

SEC. T7. In case of vacancy in the Board 1 >y reason of Ihe 
death, resignation, absence, or disqualification of any Di- 
rei tor, the cluh of which he was a member at the time he was 
chosen shall designate his successor, and at once notify the 
Secretary. Bnt if such vacancy is caused by the withdrawal, 
disbanding, or disqualification of a club represented on the 
Board, the Hoard may fill the vacancy by election in the same 
manner as provided for the election of Directors in Section 12. 
THE SECRETARY'S I" flES. 

SEC. iS. The Secretary shall be the Treasurer of tin- League, 
and as such shall be the custodian of all funds of the League; 
receive all dues, fees and assessments, make such payments 
as shall be ordered by the lioard or by the vote of the League, 
and render annually a report of his accounts, and shall give 
such bond, with approved sureties, as the Board may require. 

SBC. iq. The Secretary shall have the custody and care of 
the official records and papers of the League ; shall keep a 
true record of all meetings of the League and the Board ; shall 
issue all official notices, and attend to the necessary corre- 
spondence ; he shall prepare and furnish such reports as may 
be called for by the Board, and shall be entitled to such books, 
stationery, blanks and materials as the actual duties of his 
office may require. 

SEC. 20. The Secretary shall keep a record of all infrac- 
tions of the rules and regulations of the League that may come 
under his notice, and shall make a report on the same to the 
Board at its next meeting. 

SEC. 21. The Secretary shall receive such salary as the 
Board, by vote, shall determine, and shall be reimbursed for 
all traveling expenses actually incurred by him in the service of 
the League ; and the Board may exact from him such guaran- 
tees for the faithful performance of his duties as they would 
deem for the interest and safety of the League. At the expira- 
tion of his term of office he shall account for and deliver up to 
the Board all the property and papers which may have come 
into his hands by virtue of his office. 

LAWS GOVERNING K MI'LOYES. 
INDIVIDUAL CLUB CONTROL. 

Sec. 22. Each club belonging to this League shall have the 



8 



CONSTvfUTION. 



right to regulate its own affairs, to establish its own rules, and 
to discipline, punish, suspend or expel its own manager, play- 
ers or oilier employes, and these powers shall not be limited to 
of dishonest play or open insubordination, but shall in- 
elude all questions of carelessness, indifference or other conduct 
of the player that maybe regarded by the club as prejudicial to 
its interests ; not in conflict with any provision of this Constitu- 
tion; or the playing rules of this League. The President of the 
League shall have power, upon proper proof, to inflict a fine for 
any such offenses not exceeding $200, which fine can only be 
remitted by the board of Directors, 

H TERRITORIAL RZGR1 S. 

SEC 23. Every club of this League shall have exclusive con- 
trol of the city in which it is located and of tile-territory sur- 
rounding such city, to the extent of live miles in every direc- 
tion from its corporate limits, and no visiting League club 
shall, under any circumstances, except with the consent of the 
local League club, until all League championship games on 
that ground shall have been finished, lie allowed to play any 
club in such territory other than the League club therein 
located, nor shall a visiting League club play any game in 
April with any non-League club within said live miles from the 
1 ale limits of the city in which the League club is located, 
without the consent of the local League club. 

icr, 

. 24. Contracts between a club and its players may be 
either by telegram or writing, to be followed within thirty days 
thereafter by a contract in the form approved and promulgated 
by the Secretary to all the clubs. 

ON RESERVATION OF N.A 

. 25. Each club a member of this League shall be entitled 
right of reservation. < )n or before the 30th day of Sep- 
11 r in each year each club shall transmit to the Secretary a 
re list of the players whose ervici it, desires to retain, 
then under contract to the said club for the current or for any 
succeeding season or seasons, and in addition thereto the names 
of such players reserved in any prior annual list who have re- 
fuse. I to contract with said club. Such players, together with 
all others thereafter to be regularly contracted with, shall he 
ineligible to contract with any other club in this League except 
as hereinafter provided. No club .shall have the right to re- 
cuy player when in arrears of salarv to him. The Secre- 
tary shall promulgate such lists. 



\ 



CONSTITUTION. 9 

MAKING CONTRACTS. 
SfeC. 2f>. All contracts between clubs of this League and 
individual players shall be mack- through the Secretary, or his 
duly authorized agent. Ti W such form of 

contract as it may deem best for th< protection ol the rights of 
the panics thereto. All contracts must be approved by the 
Secretary, and duly promulgated by him. Provided, clubs be- 
longing to this League may contract with players fur any pel iod 
of time that may be mutually agreed upon. The i en days re- 
lease provided for in the seventeenth paragraph of the League 
form of contract shall begin to run from the time of notice 
if received by the Secretary of the League, who shall, at 
once, promulgate the same to all club members. At the expir- 
ation of said ten days the player so released shall lie eligible to 
contract with the releasing club, or any other club member. 

EXPULSION OF PLAYERS. 
SEC. 27. Any player, while under contract with or reserva- 
tion by a League club, who shall, without the consent of such 
club, cuter the service of any other club in any capacity, shall 
be liable to expulsion by said League club. Whenever a club 
releases a manager or player without notice, or gives him ten 
days' notice of release in accordance with the terms of his con- 
tract, and whenever it suspends or expels a manager or player, 
that club shall at once notify the Secretary of this League, 
stating, in case ot release, the date when the same takes effect, 
and in case of sn or expulsion, the cause thereof. 

NEGOTIATING FOR SERVICES, 

Sec. 28. No player, without the consent of the club with 
which he is under contract or reservation, shall enter into 
tiations with any other club for future services, but if such 
consent be obtained, a player may negotiate fur his release, and 
offer a money consideration therefor, which may be accepted 
by the said releasing club. 

EFFECT OF 1 1.1 1; DISBANDMENT. 

Sec. 29. The disbandment of a League club or its with- 
drawal from or loss of League membership shallop 
release of its players from contract and n with said 

club, but the right 1 1 with and reserve said players 

shall be subject to transl< cb other club as the League 

may designate after acceptance of their said services. 

ON SUSPENSION of PLA1 : 

. 30. No manager or player who has been suspended or 
expelled from a League club shall at any time thereafter be 



?&£ 



; 






IO CONSTITUTION. 

allowed to play with or serve in any capacity any League club 
(either the one expelling him or any oilier) unless the term of 
suspension by the club has expired, or, upon his appeal to this 
League, such expulsion or suspension shall have been set aside. 

PLAYING Wl I H 01 TSIDE I 

Sec. 31. No game of base ball shall be played between a 
League club and any other club that has been expelled from 
membership in this League. No game of ball shall be played 
between a League club and any other club employing or pre- 
senting in its nine a player expelled or under suspension from 
the League or otherwise rendered ineligible by this League or 
a club member thereof. A violation of this section shall for- 
feit the game in favor of the non-offending club, and subject it 
to such fine as the Hoard of Directors may impose. 

"CROOKEDNESS" AND IIS PENALTIES. 

SEC. 32. Any person who -.hall be proven guilty of offering, 
agreeing, conspiring or attempting to cause any game of ball to 
result otherwise than on its merits under the playing rules, or 
who, while acting as umpire, shall violate any provision of the 
Constitution, or of the playing rules adopted hereunder, may 
be forever disqualified by the President of the League from acting 
as umpire, manager, player or in any other capacity in any game 
of ball participated in by a League club. 

THE UMPIRE AND HIS DUTIES. 
THE STAFF OF UMPIRES. 

SEC. 33. A staff of League Umpires shall be selected by the 
Secretary before the opening of the regular season. 

(1) They shall be paid such salaries and allowed such ex- 
penses as may be mutually agreed upon by contract between 
them and the Secretary of the League, subject to the approval 
of the board of Directors of the League. 

(2) They shall be under the sole control and direction of the 
Secretary, from whom they will receive all assignments to duty 
and all instructions regarding the inti rpn 1 Ition of the playing 
rules, and the Secretary shall prescribe B proper uniform for 
them, all parts of which shall be worn while officiating as 
Umpire. 

THEIR DUTIES. 

(3) In the event of the failure of an Umpire to umpire a game 
assigned to them, it shall be the duty of the Secretary to pro- 

1 substitute to umpire such game, and in such case there 
shall be deducted from the next annual payment to the League 



CONSTITUTION. 



Umpire the sum of twelve dollars for each game assigned to 
him, which for any reason he shall have failed to umpire. 

(4) It shall be the duty of an Umpire to enforce the ruli 
they are written, regardless of his personal opinion as to their 
merit. This shall especially apply to Rule 52, and Section 3 of 
Rule 54, and Section t, Rule 59, and in the event of his failure 
to enforce these rules he shall he lined $25 for the first offense 
and 850 for the second offense, upon the sworn statement of the 
Captain of one of the opposing teams and two reputable wit- 
nesses, which affidavits must he forwarded to the League Sec- 
retary within twenty-four hours of the offense. 

(5) It shall he the duty of each League club to accept as 
umpire for any championship game such League Umpire or 
substitute as the Secretary shall assign to such game, and onlj 
in the event of the failure of tin League Umpire or substitute 
so assigned to appear at the hour appointed for the beginning 
of such game, shall the duty devolve upon the home club to 
designate an Umpire for such game. 

THF.lR REMOVAL. 

(6) Any League Umpire shall be subject to removal by the 
Secretary at any time, and in the event of the resignation, re- 
moval or expulsion of any League Umpire the Secretary shall 
have power to appoint a suitable person to fill the vacancy thus 
created. 

SE FOR EXPULSION. 

SEC. 34. Any League Umpire win. shall in the judgment of 
President of the League be guilty of ungentlemanly con- 
duct, or of selling or offering to sell a game of which he is 
Umpire, shall thereupon be removed front his official capacity 
and placed under the same disabilities inflicted upon expelled 
players by the Constitution of this League. 

SETTLEMENT OF CLUB DISPUTES. 

tilt. GOVERNING TRIBUNAL. 

Sec. 35. The Board of Directors shall be the sole tribunal to 
determine disputes between clubs; tin la! is to be submitted, 
and the dispute adjudicated under such regulations as the 
Board shall prescribe in each case. The finding of the Board 
shall be final, anil under no circumstances shall be reconsid- 
ered, reopened or inquired into, either by the League or any 

subsequent Hoard. 

SEC ;?". The Board shall at once consider any complaint 
preferred by a club against a manager or player of an 
club (prior to the expiration of the championship season) for 



CONSTITUTION. 



conduct in violation of any provision of this Constitution, 01 
prejudicial to the good repute of the game of baseball, and 

shall have power to require the club to which such player or 
manager may belong to discipline him, and upon repetition of 
such offense to expel him. Provided that such complaint be 
preferred in writing, giving such particulars as may enable 
I- Board to ascertain all the facts, and he transmitted to the 
Secretary, by whom it shall at once be referred to the Board. 

DICATING COMPLAINTS BY PLAYERS. 
Sec. 37- I" casc a player under contract with a League club 
shall during a current season pri fer a complaint in writing to 
the Secretary of the League against such a club, alleging that 
such club is in arrears to him for salary for more than fifteen 
days after such salary became due on account of such contract, 
the Secretary shall at once transmit to the said club a copy of 
such complaint, and require an answer thereto. On receipt of 
such answer, or if one week shall have elapsed without the re- 
ceipt of an answer, the Secretary shall refer the paper in the 
case to the Board of Directors through its Chairman, and 
should the Board find the player's complaint sustained, they 
shall require the club, under penalty of forfeiture of its mem- 
bership, to pay to the player forthwith the full amount ascer- 
tained to be due him. Provided that should the player refuse 
to serve the club pending action by the Board on his complaint, 
he will thereby forfeit the benefits of the award, and in such 
the Board shall revoke his award. 

THE COURT OF APPEAL. 
SEC. 38. The Board shall also be the sole tribunal of the 
hearing of an appeal made by any person who shall have been 
expelled, suspended, or disciplined by his club. The matter 
shall be proceeded with in the following manner: Such pi 

within thirty days after the date of the expulsion, sus- 
pension, nr discipline file with the Secretary a written state- 
ment of his defense, accompanied by a request that an appeal 
be allowed him. The Secretary shall notify the club of the i< 

foi in appeal, accompanying such notice with a copy of 
the appeal, and at the next an ing the club, by its 

duly am ! I representative, and the appellant in person, by 

attorney or by written statement, shall aappear before the 
with ih.ir testimony. Tin- Board shall impartially bear 

the matter and render their decisi which shall be final and 

ding on both club and player. 
SEC. 30. No Director shall sit in the trial of a cause in which 
his club is interested. 



CONSTITUTION. 13 

Sec. 40. Any expense of trials or arbitrations shall be borne 
equally by the parties to the controversy. 

ADOPTING PLAYING RULES. 

Sec. 41. This League shall adopt such playing rules as it 
deems best for the conduct of its business. 

THE CHAMPIONSHIP RULES. 

THE COMPETING CLUBS. 
Sec. 42. The championship of the United States, established 
by this League, shall be contended fur yearly by the clubs com- 
posing the League. 

DURATION OF THE SEASON. 

Sec. 43. The championship season shall extend from such 
date in April or May to such date in September as the League 
may determine at it's stated or special meeting. 

CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 

Sec. 44. Every game played between two clubs from the 
commencement of the championship season to the completion 
of the championship series between such clubs shall be a game 
for the championship, and no League club shall lend or ex- 
change players to or with each other for any game played dur- 
ing the championship season. Any violation of this section 
shall subject each offender to a fine of fioo. 

NUMBER OF GAMES. 

Sec. 45. Each club shall play twelve or more championship 
games with every other club, but a tie or draw game or a game 
prevented by rain shall be played off on the same grounds on a 
succeeding open date within the dates of the same schedule 
series between such clubs, ur any succeeding series. An open 
date succeeding any series of games between two clubs shall be 
considered as belonging to and within the dates of the preced- 
ing series, providing such day is not absolutely required by 
either club to meet its next schedule appointment. In case 
there is no open date 011 same ground, such game may be 
played off on the grounds of tin; other club on an open date. 

SEC. 46. Each club shall have half of the championship 
series of games with every other club played on its grounds, 
except as otherwise provided in Section 45, and in all the de- 
tails of such games that do not involve the rights of the visiting 
club under the playing rules, but relate solely to such games 
as attractive exhibitions to the patrons of the home club, the 
visiting club shall defer to the wishes of the home club, pro- 




14 



CONSTITUTION. 




vided, nevertheless, that the home club shall not be permitted 
to change the usual hour for the commencement of scheduled 
games in its particular city more than thirtj | jo) minutes with- 
oul first having obtained the consent o iting club 

thereto, under a penally to the visiting club of $500. And the 
visiting club shall furnish to a person designated by the home 
club the batting order of its nine by 10 o'clock on the morning 
of the day of each game, or the evening previous, if requested. 
In case of the failure of any visiting club to furnish the batting 
order of ils nine as herein stipulated, il shall forfeit the sum of 
§io, which amount shall be immediately transmitted t" the 
S cretaryof the League, upon the receipt oi notice from him of 
the infliction of such fine, which notice shall be given by the 
retary upon receipt of complaint from the home club. 
It shall be the duty of the home club to furnish the manager 
and captain of the visiting club with a list of the batting order 
before the commencement of the game under similar penalties 
for default as herein prescribed. The visiting club shall have 
the right to practise its nine on the grounds of the home club 
between II and 12 o'clock A. M. on each day of its visit during 
the championship season. 

THE CHAMPIONSHIP SCHEDULE. 

Sec. 47. All championship games shall be arranged in a 
written schedule preparer: icdule Committee, and re- 

I to and adopted by the League by a three-fourths vote 
before the beginning of the championship season. The sched- 
ule shall provide for an equal number of return games, and 
ify the elate of each game and the dale of each series of 
games. No date in said schedule shall subsequently be changed, 
except (1) by written agreement of two clubs from a date fixed 
bytle for a game between such clubs to another day 

prior to the first and subsequent to the last dab of the same 
lule series between such clubs ; or (2) as provided in Sec. 
45; or (3) ' j y ' ne written consents of three-fourths of all the 
League clubs. 

Any club or clubs violating this section shall bean bit to 

a penalty of $1,000. This to apply to the clubs so playing. 
Said penalty to be paid within forty-eight hours to the Treas- 
urer of the National League and American Association, or if 
11 U so paid to be withheld from any funds to their credit in the 
hands of the Treasurer. All games played in violation of this 
section shall not count in the championship series. 

THE ADMISSION FEES AND RECEIPTS. 

Sec. 48. The general admission fee to all championship 



CONSTITUTION. 



15 



games shall be fifty cents ("50), but each club shall designate 
a part of its grounds, and provide seats thereon, the admission 
fee to which shall be twenty-live (25) cents, and all division of 

1 1 Dtages shall be made on the basis of fifty (50) cents, ex- 

< i<t 19 to that part of the grounds the admission fee to which 

is fixed at twenty-five (25) cents, and as to such part of said 

grounds all division of percentage shall be on the basis of 

twenty-five cents. 

At Ihe conclusion of each championship game the home club 
shall deliver to the manager of the visiting club (and shall 
transmit by mail to the Presidenl or other designated official of 
the visiting club a duplicate of the same) a statement of the 
receipts of said game, which must include all fifty-cent and 
twenty-five cent admissions, and shall pay to the visiting club 
fifty per centum of said receipts. 

SEC. 49. Out of the funds of this League now in the hands of 
the Secretary he shall create a Sinking Fund not to exceed 
$12,000, which shall be invested in Government bonds. All 
other funds shall be placed in the treasury to meet current 
expenses. 

Tiii'. turnsi lit; cotra r. 

Sec. 50. The number of persons admitted to the grounds 
shall be determined by the use .if the necessary number of self- 
registering turnstiles, the arms of which shall extend within 
four inches of a dividing partition, the keys of which shall be 
delivered to tin- agent of the visiting club before the opening of 
Ihe grounds for each game; and said agent of the visiting club 
shall have full access to such turnstile, and the box of such 
turnstile shall not be removed until after the close of the seventh 
innings, anil in case a carriage gale is used a ticket for each 
person admitted through such gate shall at once be delivered to 
the agent of the visiting club. No person shall be admitted 
free to the grounds during or prior to such game or the hour 
appointed therefor, excepting only players of contesting clubs, 
policemen in uniform, the umpires and tin- necessary employes 

of the home club. The visiting club shall have the right to 
accept the turnstile count for each and all games, or to count 
all tickets. Each club shall be required to use for its business 
a substantial pasteboard ticket, which can be readily counted. 

DIAGRAM OF GROUNDS. 

Sec. 51. No club shall be allowed to have more than fonr 
entrances to its grounds except upon holidays, but for all such 
days the visiting club shall be given at least ten days' notice of 
the whole number and location of additional entrances ; pro- 




i6 



CONSTITUTION. 




vided, however, emergency gates may be opened by consent of 
the visiting club if occasion requires. 

STOPPING PLAY TO CATCH TRAINS. 
Sec. 52. On any day when either club is required to leave a 
city to, or in order to reach another city, where it is scheduled 
to play its next game, the home club shall be compelled upon 
proper notice by the visiting club to begin the game three 
hours and a half before the time <>f the departure of the last 
train by means of which either club can reach the next sched- 
uled point in time. And either club may leave the field at any 
time within one hour of said train time without forfeiting any 
rights or priveleges, provided live innings have been played, 
and the Umpire shall be the sole judge of the time. 

GIVING OUT RAIN CHECKS. 

Sec. 53. In the event of a game being stopped by rain before 
completion of five innings, the home club may issue rain 
checks, good for any succeeding game. If rain checks are so 
issued the visiting club shall not be entitled to its percentage 
of receipts ; but if rain checks are not issued, the visiting club 
shall be entitled to its percentage of receipts, precisely as if the 
game had been fully played, 

ON roSFBITKD OAM1 . 

Sec. 54. A club shall be entitled to forfeited games — to 
count in its series as games won by a score of nine runs to none 
— in case where the Umpire in any championship game shall 
award the game to such club on account of the violation by the 
contesting club of any section of this Constitution or of any 
playing rule ; and in the event of such forfeiture being CI 
by the withdrawal of the players during the progress of the 
game, or by a failure to report with its team at the tin)' I 
for the game, unless written notice lias been received from llie 
Clttb that the game cannot be played, then such forfeiting 
club shall incur a penalty of one thousand dollars, which shall 
be payable to the Secretary of the League within ten clays 
thereafter for the use and benefit of the non-offending club, but 
said line maybe remitted or modified upon appeal to and a 
hearing by the Hoard of Directors. In addition to the penalty 
above referred to, the captain or manager, or the person in 
charge of the offending team, and responsible for the team 
leaving the held, shall incur a penalty of one hundred dollars, 
which shall be paid within five day* to the Secretary of the 
League, said penalty not to be remitted under any circum- 
stances. ' 



CONSTITUTION. 



*7 



ON DRAWN GAMES. 

Sec. 55. Drawn, tie and postponed games shall not count in 
the series as games (but any game of not less than five innings 
shall be included in the averages), but must be played off, if 
possible, as provided in Section 45. If they cannot be played 
off, as therein provided, they may subsequently be played off, 
if sufficient time exists before the close of the season. 

Double games for One admission shall not be permitted until 
the last schedule series, when they shall be compulsory to 
the extent of playing off all postponed, tie or drawn games. 

WINNING THE PENNANT. 

Sec. 56. The club which shall have won the greatest per- 
centage of games in the championship series, shall be declared 
the champion club of the United States for the season in which 
such games were played. In the event that two or more clubs 
shall have won the same percentage of games, then the Board 
shall at once arrange a special series of three games between 
any two of such clubs, such games to be played at th close of 
the championship season, and the games so played shab be 
included in the championship record, and counted in determin- 
ing the award of the championship. In such case only the 
provisions of this Constitution prohibiting the playing or re- 
cording as championship games, games played after the expira- 
tion of the championship season, shall have no effect. The 
emblem of the championship shall be a pennant (of the National 
colors) to cost not less than one hundred dollars (§100). It 
shall be inscribed with the motto, "Champion Base Ball Club 
of the United States," with the name of the club and the year 
in which the title was won, and the champion club shall be 
entitled to fly the pennant until the close of the ensuing year. 

DECIDING 1 lit CHAMPIONSHIP. 

SEC. 57. The championship shall be decided in the following 
manner : 

Within twenty-four hours after every match game played for 
the championship, the home club shall prepare and forward to 
the Secretary of the League a statement containing the full 
score of the game, according to the system specified in the 
playing rules, the date, the place where played, the names of 
the clubs and Umpire, provided that no tie or drawn game 
shall be considered a game for any purpose except the averages; 
and provided, further, that in any case where the Secretary 
shall not receive the score of a championship game within live 
ilays after the playing of such game, the club whose duty it is 



IS 



CONSTITUTION. 



to forward such score shall pay to the League the sum of $2 a-; 
the penalty of such default. 

At the close of the season the Secretary shall prepare a tabu- 
lar statement of the games won and lost by each club, accord- 
ing to the statement so sent him, which statement shall be the 
sole evidence in the matter, and submit the same, with the 
statements so sent him, to the Hoard, who shall mal. 
award in writing and report the same to the League at its an- 
nual meeting. 

In making the award the Hoard shall consider : 

(1) The tabular statement oi the Secretary. 

(2) Forfeited games. 

(3) Games participated in by clubs which have withdrawn, 
disbanded, or forfeited their membership without completing 
their championship series with all other League clubs ; such 
games shall be counted to the following extent : The Hoard 
shall ascertain the least number of championship games played 
by such club with any club remaining in the League, and shall 
from the first game participated in during the championship 
series by such retired club, count in the series of each League 
club a similar number of games, and all other games partici- 
pated in by such retired club shall not be counted in the cham- 
pionship series. Provided, that if such retired club shall have 
failed to play at least one championship game with every 
League club, all games participated in by it shall be thrown 
out entirely. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 
Sue. 58. The annual meeting of the League shall be held on 
the first Wednesday after the second Tuesday in November of 
each year, at 12 o'clock noon, and at such places as shall have 
been determined by a vote at the previous annual meeting. 

CLUB REPRESENTATION. 

Sec. 59. At such meeting each club shall be represented and 

shall be entitled to two representatives, and to have in addition 
thereto any of its officers or ex-( ent at such meeting ; 

but no club shall be permitted to semi as a representative any 
person under contract or engagement as a ball player or man- 
ager, and belonging to the nine of said club in such capacity. 
They shall present a certificate from the President or Secretary 
of their club, showing their authority to act, but no club shall 
have more than one vote. 

THE LEAGUE SESSIONS. 
Sec. 60. This League may, upon a majority vote of its mem- 
bers, elect to go into executive session for the transaction of its 



CONSTITUTION. 

business, and during such sessions no club shall be entitled to 
more than two (2) representatives. 

SPECIAL MEETINGS. 

6l. Special meetings may be called by the President 
of this League on his own option or on the written call of six 
clubs. 

Sec. 62. A representation of a majority of clubs shall consti- 
tute a. quorum for the transaction of business, but a less num- 
ber may adjourn from time to time until a quorum is obtained. 

SEC. 63. The following shall In- the order of business, unless 
suspended by a three-fourths vote of the club members: 

1. Reading Minutes o( last meeting. 

2. Report "i Board of Directors. 
3- Report of Committees. 

4. Election of new members. 

5- Amendment of Constitution. 

6. Amendment of Playing Rules. 

7. Election of Officers. 

8. Miscellaneous business. 

9. Adjournment. 

AMENDMENTS. 

Sec. 64. (1) The Constitution of this League may be altered 
or amended by a three-fourths vote of the League at any animal 
meeting, or by a unanimous vote at any other time. Provided, 
ver, that this section and Sections ), B, 4^ and 49, shall 
not I,,- altered or amended except by a unanimous vote of this 
League. 

(2) Any section of this Constitution may be suspi n 
provision mad. non-applicable by unanimous vote at a League 



.\A I [ONAI. AGREEMENT. 



NATIONAL AGREEMENT 

Of Professional />W Ball Associations Adopted by the National 

Board of Arbitration February 24, 1896. 

NAME. 
Article 1. This instrument »hall be called " The National ifrreemi 
Professional Bate Ball A 

1 
ARTICLE 2. The objects of this Agreement are : 

1. To perpetuate base hall as the national game of America, and to sur- 
round it with such safeguards as to warrant absolute public confidence in its 
integrity and methods. 

2. To promote and afford protection to such minor Professional 1!., 
Leagues and Associations as may desire to operate under its provisi 

1 111. GOVERNING POWER. 
Article 3. The governing power under this Agreement, which shall be 
called "The National Board of Arbitration," shall be vested in five repre- 
sentatives selected by the National League and American Association of 
Professional Base Ball Clubs (hereinafter designated the Major Lcagu. 
such representatives from minor organizations of Professional l! ; , 
Clubs (hereinafter designated Minor Leagues) us maybe admitted to mem- 
bership by the National Board of Arbitration from time to time under the 
rules governing membership. 

THE ANNUAL MEETING, 
Article- 4. The annual meeting 'f the National Board shall be hi 

the of each year, at which time the representatives elected by 

the major league shall elect a President, Secretary and Treasurer of ilie 
Board. 

DUTIES ami AUTHORITY OP THE RATIONAL BOARD. 
The general enforcement of this Agreement, the pro, 
of rights thereunder, the determination .,f all controversies ai ben 
provided and generally the regulation of ill things within the scope 

Agreement arc each and severally conferred upon anil 1 uiiieil to the 

National Board of Arbitration. 

2. The Board may 

each and all of its members and officers, its mctb , , , j ,),,. 

general transaction of its business. 

3. It shall be the duty of the Board and il shall have lull an. I Una] 
diction : To bear and determine all disputes and complaints between ■ 

ad clubs; between one club and another, members of different 
is; between clubs and players or managers, and, in add 

all disputes and complaints arising under and of all matters involving the 
interpretation of the National Agreement or the disposition of the right*, 



NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 21 

thereunder. Clubs I ■ nion, by mutual content, or 

upon the request of the association to which they belong, may n 
troversy between such club, or in which such clubs are Interested to the 
Hoard for decision or adjustment. 

POWER TO IMPOSE FINES. 

4, [n the performance of its duties the Board ahall'lukve power to I 
fines or penalties upon associations, clubs, club officers, players, managers 
scorers and umpires, and to suspend Onysuch organisation or person Iroirj 
the protection and privileges of the National Agreement in any instance in 
which, in its opinion, it or he shall have been guilty of conduct detrimental 
to the genera] welfare uf the game or in violation of the letter or spirii 
National Agreement. 

DECISION FINAL. 

6, Its decision shall be'final over any and all mattei within i t >, jurisdii 



B. fl 1 



REINSTATEMENTS. 
iv reinstate any person or body suspended. 



ASSESSMENTS. 

7. It shall have power to make such reasonable assessments upon clubs or 
associations as maybe necessary to defray the expenses incidental to the 
performance of its duties and the enforcement of this Agreement. 

RULES AND REGULATIONS. 

8. It may make all orders, rules and regulations for the performance 
duties and the exercise of its power, and to accomplish the purpose in rfew, 

ttnead and supplement the same from time to time ; provided, notice 
of all changes, amendments or supplements be given to all organisations 
party to this agreement. 

DECISIONS PROMULGA1 l.n. 
'.I. It may cans- its proceedings or ruling-, or any part thereof, in an 
which may be deemed of sufficient importance to serve as a pre 
published in such a manm prescribed. 

PRESENTATION OF CLAIMS. 
10. Whenever any body or persons shall desire to submit any matter foi 
the consideration of th. I'.. anl. it shall be presented to the chairman by a 
concise statement thereof, I mpanied by such evidence aauurj 

support of such statement, Notice shall be given to any othei 
son interested in the mattei oswer and to present appropriate evi- 

dence in support thereof. 

MINOR LEAGUE MEMBERSHIP. 

ARTICLE 6. An application for membership and protection under this 

Agreement must be made in writing or by telegraph to the Secretary of the 

If made by telegraph it niu-t state the nan. rue, the cities 

comprising the circuit and have the signature of the President of the 1 

which must be followed within ten days by a written application to the Sec- 



NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



I 



retary of the Board stating the name comprising 

the circuit, the representatives of the respective cities, the location of their 
business offices and playing grounds, if practical, the monthly salary limit 
for its club teams and maximum monthly salary limit of its players, a pledge 
or agreement for the maintenance of said salary limit and the faithful per- 
formance of its obligations under this Agreement, its own Constitution and 
liy-Laws and its other contractual obligations, which club membership, 
i of club offices and playing grounds, salary limit, Constitution, 
Agreements, By-La .:»s, shall not, after approval by tfei I 

•i d, altered or releaserl without the assent of the I 

CLASSIFICATION OF MEMBERSHIP. 
Che Board, upon the receipt of an application for pri 

membership under this Agreement, shall, after consideration and approval, 
determine the class under which the applicant shall he admitted, I n 
classification to be based upon the average population of the cities compos 
i tig the League according to the last published U. S. Census preceding the 
application, and membership fee shall be an amount fixed by the Board 
for Leagues of that 

MINOR LEAGUE REPRESENTATION. 
Aktici.k 8. Each Minor League shall be.enliiled to one representative of 
its own selection, who shall have the right to appear before the Hoard upon 
any or all matters pertaining to its interest or Welfare, but the Board may, 
at its discretion, invite additional representation in the adjustment 
matter which may be brought before it. 

FEE FOR PROTECTION AND MEMBERSHIP. 

Article 9. The fee for membership and protection under this Agreement, 
with the right of reservation subject to Articles lit and 11 shall be: 
For each Club in Class A the - urn of | 
For each Club in Class I! the lUUI '.I 

' : the sum ol 
each Club in I i mm of $30. 

For each Club in I tun of $20. 

For each Club in Class I thi sum of $10. 

do within thirty days from thi i ng the 

written appl nembership. 

« OT PLAYERS BY THE MAJOR 
Asticli 10. f.., the purpose of enabling players to advance in their pro- 
fession, the M.„n, League may. at any time after l. 

^"•••"" 1 '" 1 iry following, with 

Board, negotiate with any player then and 

minor league und, 

Player, upo„ ,. , f ^ „ 

Art.de 18, provided ,hat , lion shall b, 

of a player shall be made unless he shall receive aa increase of salarv 



NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



23 



SELECTION OF PLAYERS BY MINOR LEAGUES. 
Articlb 11. For the purpose of enabling players to advance in tlieir pro- 
m and to assist in building up clubs of minor league 1 higher 

class shall have the right, with the consent of the Board, after January] 1 
year, and prior to the first of February following, to select players from a 

in a lower class upon payment to ih'- Secretary of the Hoard tl 
specified in Article 1'2. provided that tti ion shall be 

no transfer of a player shall he made unless he shall receive an loci 

1KKMS FOR SELECTION OF PLAYERS. 

. 1. Clubs from a high da- players from 

leagues of a lower class shall pay 1 lary of the Board for the 

I and account of the cluh from whi.h the selei tion is made the follow- 
ing sums, vi/.: 

For Flayers in Class A, |500 

For Players in Class B, $300. 

Players in CI 
; , Players in Claw D, $100. 
For Players in Class F, 
For Players in Class F, $50. 
■;. Payments must be made at the tint ion, and unless 

hi he withdrawn and the selection i incelled by the sel 
within thirty days from the 'late of selection, the Secretary of the 

shall remit to the cluh the amount received by him on account of su, h 

i ion. 

Skc. 3. Any club entitled to make selection of a player ami de 
so, shall notify the Secretary of the Hoard stating the name of the player 
ami of the club with which he is under contract ami reservation and i 
ing anl , 1, Article IS, to be paid for such release. 

The Secretary shall thereupon notify the cluh or league from which such 
selection is to be made and shall order his transfer to • ig club. 

Notice of such selection and transfer shall thereupon be pi 

ASSIGNMENT OF UNDEVELOPED PLAYERS. 

Ahtki.k 13. For the purpose of retaining control of undeveloped but 
promising players whose releases have been purchs 

to Ihi , may, prior 1,. ih. 

assign it! turplus players I lul lb< I 01 '"'. I thi i I eague patty loihis 

tnent, upon mutual agreement between the clu 

no other club member of the League front which the assignment i 

desires such player at the term i such 

transfers and assignments and the conditions governing must be filed with 
the Secretary of the Board, and the salary of the player must not he less 
than the salary limit adopted by the league to wllll n assigned. 

Akt. I 1. Any I lub member of the major league may at any lime between 
April I and October 1 negotiate with a club member of a minor l- 
party to thi* Agreement, for the release of a player from minor to major 



24 



NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



league, to take effect after October 1 of the same year, or for an immediate 
release if the Constitution of such minor league permits, ..mi gucfa rel 
if secured, shall, when filed with the Secretary of the Hoard, become binding 
upon both clubs party to the transfer. 

Art. 15. Any club member of a minor league, party to this Agreement i 
may at any time during its championship season negotiate for the immediate 
release of a player from a club member of another League where the league 
constitution of the releasing club permits, and such release, if secured, shall, 
when tiled with the Secretary of the Hoard, become binding upon both clubs 
party to the transfer, providing the salary of the player so transferred dur- 
i ng the championship season shall not be reduced during the balance of the 
season unless he be given an unconditional release. 
CONTRACTS. 

Article 16. Contracts between clubs and players shall be in writing in 
the form approved by the Hoard. An informal contract, whether evidenced 
by telegram or other writing, shall be valid for a period not exceeding 
thirty days, but a formal contract must be tendered by the contracting club 
to the contracting player within said thirty days. The failure of the chit) 
to so tender such formal contract will release the player from all contractual 
obligations thereunder, and the refusal of the player to execute such formal 
contract, when so tendered, shall extend the validity of his informal contract 
until he shall execute said formal contract. 

TN LAWFUL CONTRACTS. 

Article IT. No club shall at any time enter into negotiations or contract 
with any player under contract to or reservation by another club without 
the latter's consent, under such tines and penalties as the Hoard may inflict. 
APPLICATION For MEMBERSHIP. 

Article 18. Applications for membership by minor leagues desiring 
protection under this Agreement must be made each year to the Secretary 
of the Hoard, as provided in Article 6. 

TERMINATION OF MEMBERSHIP. 

Article 19. All rights under this Agreement shall terminate on the first 
day of October unless renewed between the fifteenth and twenty-fifth of 
September of each year, according to Article IK. 
NEW LEAGUES. 

AbTICLbSO. Newly organised leagues may ask for and be admitted to 
membership at any time, but such membership shall terminate on the first 
of October following unless renewed according to Article 19, 
RESERVATION. 

Article 21. On or before the 85th day of September in each year the 
secretaries of minor leagues, parties hereto, entitled to the prjvll< 
reservation, shall transmit to the Secretary of the Hoard a reserve list of 
players, not exceeding fourteen in number, then under contract with each of 
its several club members for the current season, and in addition th« 
list of such players reserved in any prior annual reserve list who have re- 
fused to contract with such clubs and of all ineligible players. Such play- 
ers, together with all others thereafter to be regularly contracted with by 



NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



25 



such clubs, are and Shall be ineligible to contract with any other I tub of any 
league, except as herein prescribed. The Secretary of said Hoard shall 
thereupon promulgate such lists, provided that no club shall be permitted to 
reserve; any player while in arrears of salary to him. 

RELEASE PROM RESERVATION, 

ARTICLE 22. The Hoard may also release- from contract or reservation any 
player or manager when the club with which he has contracted, or by which 
he has been reserved, shall be in arrears to him for salary for more than 
fifteen days after such salary became due, or when the reserving club has 
failed to tender to any player, on or before the first day of March, after such 
reservation, a formal contract, with a salary of at least such an amount per 
month as the Board may fix as the minimum salary to be paid 10 such player, 
or when any such reserving club has transferred its membership after the 
close of the championship season to a different league, if the Board shall 
deem that the player will be prejudiced by such transfer. 
INDIVIDUALS AND ORGANIZATIONS IN CONFLICT WITH THE 
NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 

Article 23— Sec. 1. Any club member of any Minor league or associa- 
tion, a party to or identified with the National Agreement, that shall enter 
into any negotiation to become a member of or in any way co-operate with 
any organization of professional base ball clubs whose existence will in any 
manner conflict with the letter and spirit of this Agreement or the interests 
of any of the clubs operating under it, shall forthwith forfeit all rights and 
privileges conferred by this Agreement, said forfeiture to include its mem- 
bership in any association a party to this Agreement, and all rights of reser- 
vation to players reserved during the current or any preceding season. The 
penalty herein imposed shall be positive and final and shall not be revoked 
unless by the unanimous consent of the Board or upon appeal by a three- 
fourths vote of the major league. 

Skc. 2. Any officer, manager or player who shall enter into any such 
negotiations as referred to in Section 1 of Article 23, or who shall agree or 
contract to play with any club < member of such organization shall be de- 
clared ineligible and subject to all the disabilities referred to in the preced- 

' ion - DISQUALIFIED PLAYERS. 

ARTICLE 94. When a player or manager under contract or reservation by 
any club of an association party hereto shall be expelled, suspended or ren- 
ineligible in accordance with the provisions of this Agreement or the 
rules of such association, notice of such disqualification shall be given to the 
retary of the association from wlo.se club the player 
..,vc been thus disqualified, and the Board shall forthwith give notice 
of such disqualification to the several leagues acting under this Agreement. 
When a player shall become ineligible under the provisions of this Agree- 
ment, or by order of the Board, the Secretary of the Board shall notify the 
several clubs acting under this Agreement of such disqualification. from 
och notice all club meml.' stions acting under 

this Agreement shall be debarred from employing or playing with or against 



26 



\ \ I ION w. AGREEMENT. 



lifted player until the period of disqualification shall have ter- 
minated or the disqualification be revoked by the association from which 
such player was disqualified or by the Board, and due noth B of iu< b revo- 
cation shall he given by the Board to the said several clubs. 

i NSION OF PLAYERS. 

Article 35, iny player who lias entered into i< otra with any club 
of an association party hereto may be suspended without payor fined by 
lub or association for breach of • ontra I or brea< h of any of the rules 
of such club or association, and he shall thereafter be ineligible to sign or 
play during the remainder of the current season with any of the club* r »f any 
association acting hereunder, unless such disability shall have been | ■ at 
removed by the club or association by which he was suspended or by the 
Board. 

■ i ■ i PTANCB OP SERVICE. 

Article 26. Upon the release of a player from contracl or reservation 
with any club member of an association then acting under this Agreement 
(unless the release be made by " selection " under Article 10 or 11), the ser- 
vices of such player shall at once be subject to acceptance by any club 
belonging to the sain on, expressed in writing or by telegraph to 

the Secretary of the Hoard, for a period of ten days after notice of said 
release ; and, thereafter, if said services be not so accepted, said player may 
late and contract with any club. The releasing club shall send notice 
to the Secretary of the Board of said player's release on the date thereof, 
and the latter shall promulgate any acceptance of his services. Provided 
that the disbaiidment of a club or its expulsion from membership in either 
association acting hereunder shall operate as a release of all of its players 
from contract with or reservation by said club. But the services of such 
players shall at once be subject to the acceptance of such association for a 
period of ten days for the purpose of supplying the vacancy in its membership. 

CON1 K<>i, ami DISCIPLINE. 
Article iJT. Each association shall have the right to make and enforce 
all rules and regulations pertaining to the control, discipline and compensa- 
tion of all players iin«l-r contracl witfa its club members. Audit may pre- 
scribe that all contracts with its players shall be made directly with said 
ib members, with the righl of reservation to 
be exclusively exercised by said association, in which event all the provisions 
of this Agreement applying to contracts or reservation of p layers with and 
by club members, shall apply to such contracts and reservation of players 
with and by i j on . prov i dc( i tnat sucn ru i cs and regulations shall 

in no way conflict with the provisions of this Agreement, or any rule. 1 1 
tion or order of the Board. 

i ERRITORIAL RIGHTS. 

Vki " li " lim,r league whose application for membership under 

this Agreement has been accepted by the Hoard shall have exclusive I onin 1 
of its own territory until the termination of its membership, and no 
from any other league party to this Agreement shall be allowed to p 



■■■■■■■■•W-'SC' 



NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 2 ; 

game in .my city of its circuit without the consent of the club representing 
such city, nor shall any club member of a minor league party heri 
allowed to play a game within 'five miles of any city in which islocated a 
club member of the major league without the consent of such club. 
INELIGIBLE PLAYERS. 
Article 2!). No game shall be played between any club of any league 
acting hereunder, or any of its players under contract or reservation, with 
any club containing an ineligible player ; nor with a club that has played 

with another club containing such ineligible player. A violation of this s, ( 
tion shall subject each offender to fine, suspension or expulsion, in the 
discretion of the Board. 

TRANSFER OF PLAYERS. 

Article 30. Should a club of any association agree in writing or by tele- 
graph with another club of an association, subject to the National Agreement, 
for the release of any player then under contract or reservation with or by it, 
in accordance with the rules governing, either parly may lilt- said agreement 
with the Secretary' of the Board, and should any such club, refuse to comply 
with its said agreement, the Hoard may require said agreement to be complied 
with, and may transfer the said player accordingly. 

• PAYMENTS OF SALARIES. 

Article 31. Before any league shall be granted the privileges and protec- 
tion of this Agreement, It shall enact laws ,,r regulations debarring any of its 
clubs from entering into contract with any player while under am-. us ..I salary 
to him, and from suspending or otherwise attempting to disqualify such player 
lor refusing to contract while it is so in arrears, and shall also provide for the 
expulsion ol any club for refusal to pay arrears ol salary to a player when 
required by said league or by the Board. 

FORFEITURE OF RIGHTS. 

Article :tt. All rightsol any league hereunder shall be forfeited for fail- 
ing to expel any of its club members that may play a game of ball except 
under the Playing Rules adopted by the National League and American 
ition of Professional Base Ball Clubs. 

DEFINITION of TERMS. 

Article 33. The term "league or association" as herein used shall 
mean and comprise an organization of professional base ball clubs ,,i not less 
than four clubs, whether known as a "league," "association," or by any- 
other designation. 

ARTICLE 84. This Agreement may be altered or amended at any time by 
the unanlmou I onsen! of the Board, or upon the recommendation ol 

nh scribing. It shall lake effect and be in force from and 
after February 24, 1886. And all former Agrccincnls are hereby r. , 

CLASSIFICATION OF LEAGI I fO BE GOVERNED BY THE AGGRE- 
GATE POPUI ITION OF THE CITIES REPRESENTED. 

Class A 1,000,000 I lass D 100,000 to 260,000 

Class fi 600,000 to 1,000,000 i la is E 60,000 to 100.000 

CJasi C 880,000 to 500,000 I Class F— Upto 



28 



KUI.ES and regulation-.. 



The Rules and Regulations of the National 
Board of Arbitration. 

The following rules and regulations have been adopted by 
the National Hoard of Arbitration, and are here given in order 
that they may be understood by all those interested. The same 
being adopted and to remain in force until repealed, altered, 
added to or amended. 

THE CHAIRMAN. 

1. The duties of the Chairman shall be as follows: 

(a) To issue calls for meetings of the Hoard, and preside at 
such meetings; having all powers with reference thereto which 
are incident to a presiding officer. 

(b) To rule upon and decide all incidental and routine mat- 
ters presented for determination, with power to delegate this 
duty to the Secretary or any member of the Hoard. 

(<•) To supervise the performance of the duties imposed upon 
the other members of the Hoard. 

(</) To see that each and all of the orders of this Hoard are 
complied with. 

111!'. SECRETARY AND TREASURER. 

2. The offices of the Secretary and Treasurer may be filled 
by one and the same person, and the duties of such officer shall 
be as follows: 

(") lo receive, receipt for and disburse all moneys payable 
to this Hoard, and to make all financial statements required by 
the provisions of the National Agreement. 

(*) To keep the records of the proceedings of the I 

Ber with all the records required to be kept by the provi- 
sions of the National Agreement. 

(<) lo issue all notices required by the National Agrc< 
to be issued. 

<<') To give interpretation to the playing rules when re. pi 
'do, pursua.nl to the provisions of the National Agreement. 

(e) lo receive all applications for membership under the 
National Agreement, and to see that the applicants pay their 
proper dues. ' ' ' ' 

(/) To give notice of all fines and penalties imposed by the 
Board, and to see that the same are paid. 

(ri To attend to such other matters as maybe required of 

him by the Hoard, and to keep records of all 'the busine 
duties connected with the Hoard. 



&k 



RllI.KS AND REGULATIONS. 



2o 



ELECTIONS. 

The Chairman and the Secretary and Treasurer shall be 
elected annually at some metting after the first of January, and 
shall hold until their successors are elected and qualify. 

OPINIONS AND DECISIONS. 
Whenever any controversy or matter to be submitted to the 
Hoard of adjustment or decision shall be forwarded, together 
with all evidence and documents therewith connected, to the 
Secretary and Treasurer, he shall, after submitting the same to 
the Board, promulgate or publish the opinion, which must be 
prepared by the Chairman or such other member of the Hoard 
as he shall designate. 

SELECTION OF PLATERS. 

Whenever any player shall be "selected " by more than one 
club, the Board will award him to the club which shall have 
first filed formal notice with the Secretary that it desires the 
services of said player. Such notice, however, must be accom- 
panied by the deposit required by the provisions of the National 
Agreement, otherwise such notice will be of no effect ami void. 
A player so awarded shall be ineligible to sign with any other 
club, and upon declining to abide by the decisions of the Board, 
may be included in the regular list of reserved players of the 
club selecting him, as per the provisions of Article 21 of the 
National Agreement. 

ACCEPTED PLAYERS. 
Whenever the services of any playei released under the pro- 
visions of the National Agreement are accepted by any club or 
association, authorized so to do by the provisions of such 
agreement, notice thereof shall be at once given to the Secre- 
tary, who shall accordingly promulgate the fact. 

PAYMENTS. 
All expenses of the Board, including compensation to the 

iry and Treasurer, or to any other agent, officer or 
member of the Board for special work performed, telegraphing, 
postage and such other expenses as shall be allowed, hum be 
paid by check of the Secrecary and Treasurer and vouchers 
taken thereof, which vouchers shall be Submitted at least 1 
a year to the Board for examination and approval. 



- 



THE NATIONAL HOARD 



ARBITRATION. 



1896. 



OFFICE : WASHINGTON, I >. C. 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD : 

N. E. Vol no, - . Chairman, Secretary and 'treasurer. 

1 '»< 1 x 536, \\ ashington, D. < '. 
Chas. 11. Byrne, Brooklyn, N. V. 

A. II. SuDI.N, .... . BoStOIl, M.'lss^ 

foHN T. Brush, - - • Indianapolis, [nil. 



!»E»i*«:«l^*T»«wj:sfc*« - 



CORRECT DIAGRAM OF A BALL FIELD- 

C 




KOTE. For Specifications See Rules from No. 2 to No. 1*. 



THE PLAYING RULES 



Professional Base Ball Clubs 

As adopted by the National League and American Association of 

Professional Base Ball Clubs. 

Copyright, lHOfi, by the American Sports Publishing Co. 



THE BALL GROUND. 

RULE I. The Ground must be an inclosed field, sufficient 
in size to enable each player to play in his position as required 
by these rules. 

Rule 2. To lay off the lines governing the positions and 
play off the game known as Base Ball, proceed as follows: 

From a point, A, within the grounds, project a right line out 
into the field, and at a point, B, 154 feet from point A, lay off 
lines B C and B D at right angles to the line A B; then, with B 
as centre and 63.63945 feet as radius, describe arcs cutting the 
lines B A at F and 1! C at G, B D at II and B E at I. Draw 
lines F (), G E, E II and II F, and said lines will be the con- 
taining lines of the Diamond or Infield. 

THE CATCHER'S LINES. 

Rule 3. With F as centre and 90 feet radius, an arc cut- 
ting line F A at L, and draw lines L M and L O at right angles 
to F A; and continue same out from F A not less than 90 (eet. 
THE FOUL LINE. 

Rule 4. From the intersection point, F, continue the straight 
lines F G and F H until they intersect with the lines L M and 
L I, and then from the points G and H in the opposite direc- 
tion until they reach the boundary lines of the grounds. 

THE PLAYERS' LINES. 
Rule 5. Willi F as centre and 50 feet radius, describe arcs 
cutting lines F O and E M at V and Q; then, with F as centre 
again and 75 feet radius, describe arcs cutting F G and F II at 
R and S; then from the points P, Q, R and S draw lines at 
right angles lo the lines F O, F M, F G and F H, and continue 
same until they intersect at the points T W and W. 
THE CAPTAIN AND COACIIERS' LINE. 

Rule 6. With R and S as centres and 15 feet radius, de- 
scribe arcs cutting lines R W and S T at X and Y, and from 
the points X and Y draw lines parallel with lines F H and F G, 
and continue same out to the boundary lines of the ground. 



™& 



PLAYING RULES. 33 

THE THREE FOOT LIME. 

Rule 7. With F as centre and 45 feet radius, describe an 
arc cutting line F G at 1, and from 1 out to the distance of 3 
leet draw a line at right angles lo F G, and marked point 2 ; 
then from point 2, draw a line parallel with the line F G to a 
point 3 feet beyond the point G, and marked 3 ; then from the 
point 3 draw a'line at right angles to line 2, 3, back to and in- 
tersecting with line F G, and from thence back along line G F 
to point I. T IIE PITCHER'S PLATE. 

RULE 8. With point F as centre and 60.5 feet as radius, 
describe an arc cutting the line F 15 at a point 4. and draw a 
line s, 6, passing through point 4 and extending 12 inchi ion 
either side of line F B ; then with line 5, 6, as a side, describe 
a parallelogram 24 inches by 6 inches. 
THE BASES. 

Rule 9. Within the angle F, describe a square the sides 
of which shall be 12 inches, two of its sides lying upon the 
lines F G and F II, and within the angles (i and II describe 
squares the side of which shall be 15 inches, the two outer 
sides of said square lying upon the lines F G and G I and I' II 
and II I, and at the angle E describe a square whose side shall 
be 15 inches and so descr bed that its sides shall be parallel 
with G I and I II and its centre immediately over the angular 
point E. THE BAT sman's line. 

Rule 10. On either side of the line A F B describe two 
parallelograms 6 feet long and 4 feel wide (marked 8 and 9), 
their length being parallel with the line A F 15, their distance 
apart being 6 inches, added to each end of the length of the 
diagonal of the square within the angle F, and the centre of 
their length being upon said diagonal. 

Rule II. The Home I'.ase at F and the Pitcher's Plate at 4 
must be of whitened rubber and so fixed in the ground as to be 
even with t lie surface. 

R.ULB I2. The Firsl I'.ase at G, the Second Base at F, and 
the Third Base at II, must 1m- of white canvas bags, filled with 
soft material and securely fastened in their positions described 
in Rule 9. 

RULE 13. The lines described in Rules 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 10 
must be marked with lime, chalk or other suitable material, 
so as to be distinctly seen by the Umpire, 
lilt: BALL, 
1 t. The i ■ 1 ■■-.. Vote.) 

♦The Spalding League Ball has been adopted by > 
the past nineteen years, and is used in ill 1 I tests, 

Kor junior clubs (clubs composed of boys under l'i years of age] we 1 
mend them to use the Spalding Boys' League Ball and tfa 
junior clubs with this ball will count as legal games th< played 

with the Official League Ball. 



PT.AYINO RULES. 



SECTION I. Must not weigh less than five nor more than five 
an'l one-quarter ounces avoirdupois, and it must measure not 
less than nine nor more than nine and one-quarter inches in 
circumference. The Spalding League Ball, or the Reach 
American Association Ball, must be used in all games played 
under these rules. 

Sec. 2. For each championship game two regulation balls 
shall be furnished by the Home Club to the Umpire for use. 
When the ball in play is batted to foul ground, and out of sight 
of the Umpire, the other ball shall be immediately brought into 
play. As often as one of the two in use shall be lost a new one 
must be substituted, so that the Umpire shall at all times 
after the game begins have two balls in his possession and 
ready for use. The moment the Umpire delivers an alternate 
ball to the pitcher it comes into play, and shall not be 
exchanged until it, in turn, passes out of sight to foul ground. 
At no time shall the ball be intentionally discolored by rubbing 
it with the soil or otherwise. 

Sec. 3. In all games the balls played with shall be furnished 
by the Home Club, and the last ball in play shall become the 
the properly of the winning club. Each ball to be used in 
championship games shall be examined, measured and weighed 
by the Secretary of the League, inclosed in a paper box and 
sealed with the seal of the Secretary, which seal shall not be 
broken except by the Umpire in the presence of the Captains 
of the two contesting nines after play lias been called. 

The Home Club shall have at least a dozen regulation balls 
on the field ready for use on the call of the Umpire during 
each championship game. 

Sic. 4. Should the ball become cut or ripped so as expose 
the interior, or in any way so injured as to be, in the opinion 
of the Umpire, unlit for fair use, he shall, upen appeal by 
either Captain, at once put the alternate ball into play and call 
for a new ball. 

Ill I. HA I . 

RULE 15. The Bat. 

Must be made entirely of hard wood, except that the handle 
may be wound with twine, or a granulated substance applied, 
not to exceed eighteen inches from the end. 

It must be round, and it must not exceed two and three- 
quarter inches in diameter in the thickest part, nor exceed 
forty-two inches in length. 

THE PLAYERS AM) THEIR POSITIONS. 

RULE 16. The players of each club in a game shall be nine 
in number, one of whom shall act as Captain, and in no case 
shall less than nine men be allowed to play on each side. 

Rule 17. The players' positions shall be such as maybe 



PLAYING RULES. 35 

issigned them by their Captain, except that the pitcher must 
take the position as defined in Rules 8 and 29. 

Rule 18. Players in uniform shall not be permitted to 
occupy seats or to stand among the spectators. 

Rule 19. SECTION i. Every club shall adopt uniforms for 
its players, but no player shall attach anything to the sole or 
heel of his shoes other than the ordinary base ball shoe plate. 

SBC. 2. The catcher and first baseman are permitted to wear 
a glove or mit of any size, shape or weight. All other players 
are restricted to the use of a glove or mit weighing not over 
ten ounces, and measuring in circumference around the palm 
of the hand not over fourteen inches. 

PLAYERS' benches. 

Rule 20. The Players' Benches must be furnished by the 
Home Club, and placed upon a portion of the ground outside 
of and not nearer than twenty-five feet to the players' lines. 
One such bench must be for the exclusive use of the visiting 
club, and one for the exclusive use of the Home Club. All 
players of the side at the bat must be seated on their bench. 
except such as are legally assigned to coach base runners, and 
also the batsman when called to the bat by the Umpire, and 
under no circumstances shall the Umpire permit any person, 
except the club president, managers and players in uniform, to 
occupy seats on the benches. 

THE GAME. 

Rule 21. Section i. Every Championship game must be 
commenced not later than two hours before sunset. 

Sec. 2. A Game shall consist of nine innings to each con- 
testing nine, except that 

(a) If the side first at bat scores less runs in nine innings 
than the other side has scored in eight innings, the game shall 
then terminate. 

(b) If the side last at bat in the ninth innings scores the win- 
ning run before the third man is out, the game shall terminate. 

A tie QAHE. 

Rule 22. If the score be a tie at the cud of nine innings, 
play shall be continued until one side has scored more runs 
ilian the other in an equal number of innings, provided that if 
the side last at bat scores the winning run before the third 
is out the game shall terminate. 

A DRAWN G \ME. 

Rule 23. A Drawn Game shall be declared by the Umpire 
when he terminates a game on account of darkness or rain, 
after five equal innings have been played, if the score at the 
time is equal on the last even innings played ; except when the 
side that went second to bat is then at the bat and has scored 
the same number of ruus as the other side, iu which case the 



ff 




30 PLAYING RULES. 

Umpire shall declare the game drawn without regard to I'le 
score of the last equal Innings. 

A CALLED GAME. 

Rule 24. If the Umpire calls " Game " on account of dark- 
ness or rain at any time after five innings have been completed ; 
the score shall be that of t lie last equal innings played ; excepl 
the si' ■■ ■: at bat shall have scored one or more runs than 

the side first at bat, in which case the score of the game shall 
be the total number of runs made. 

A FORFEITED GAME. 

RULE 25. A forfeited game shall be declared by the Umpire 
in favor of the club not in fault, at the request of such dab, in 
the following casts : 

1 ION I. If the nine of a club fail to appear upon a field, 
or being upon the field, fail to begin the game within five min- 
utes after the Umpire has called " Play," at the hour appointed 
for the beginning of the game, unless such delay in appearing 
or in commencing the game be unavoidable. 

Sec. 2. If, after the game has begun, one side refuses or 
fails to continue playing, unless such game has been suspended 
or terminated by the Umpire. 

Sec. 3. If, after play has been suspended by the Umpire, 
one side fails to resume playing within one minute after the 
Umpire has called " Play." 

Sec. 4. If a team resorts to dilatory movements to delay (he 
game. 

Sec. 5. If, in the opinion of the Umpire, any one of the 
rules of the game is wilfully violated. 

Sec. 6. If. after ordering the removal of a player as authorized 
by Rule 60, Sec. 5, said order is not obeyed within one minute. 

SEC, 7. In case the Umpire declares a game forfeited, he 
shall transmit a written notice thereof to the President of the 
League within twenty-four hours thereafter. 

' IME. 

Rule 26. "No Game" shall be declared by the Umpire if 
he shall terminate play on account of rain or darkness, before 
five in each side are completed, except in a case when 

the game is called, and the club second at bat shall have 
more runs at the end of its fourth innings than the club first at 
bat has made in its \\\c innings, in such case the Umpire shall 
award the game to the club having marie the greatest number 
of runs, and it shall be a legal game and be so counted in the 
championship record. 

SOB I 

RULE 27. SECTION I. In every championship game each 
side shall be required to have present on the field, in uniform, 
one or more substitute players. 



n.AYING I 



37 



SBC. 2. Any such player may be substituted at any lima by 
cither club, but a player thereby retired shall not thereafter 
participate in the game. 

SEC. 3. The Base Runner shall not have a substitute run for 
him except by consent of the Captains of the contesting teams. 
CHOICE OF INNINGS— CONDITION OF GROUND. 

Rule 28. The choice of innings shall be given to the Cap- 
tain of the Home Club, who shall also be the sole judge of the 
fitness of the ground for beginning a game after rain, but after 
play has been called by the Umpire he alone shall be the judge 
as to the fitness of the ground for resuming play afte;' the game 
has been suspended on account of rain. 

THE PITCHER'S POSITION. 
Rui-F. 29. The Pitcher shall take his position facing the 
Batsman with both feet square on the ground, and in front of 
the Pitcher's plate, but in the act of delivering the ball to the 
bat one foot must be in contact with the pitcher's plate, de- 
fined in Rule 8. He shall not raise either foot, unless in the 
act of delivering the ball to the bat, nor make more than one 
step in such delivery. 

When the Pitcher feigns to throw the ball to a base he must 
resume the above position and pause momentarily before de- 
livering the ball to the bat. 

A FAIRLY DELIVERED BALL. 
Rule 30. A Fairly Delivered Ball to the bat is a ball pitched 
or thrown to the bat by the Pitcher while standing in his posi- 
tion and facing the Batsman, the ball so delivered to pass over 
any portion of the Home Base not lower than the Batsman's 
knee, nor higher than his shoulder. 

AN UNFAIRLY DELIVERED BALL. 
RULE 31. An Unfairly Delivered Ball is a ball delivered by 
the Pitcher, as in Rule 30, except that the ball dues not pass 
over any portion of the Home Base, or does pass over the I Ionic 
Base above th ) Batsman's shoulder or below the knee, 
BALKING. 
Rule 32. A Balk shall be : 

SECTION I. Any motion made by the Pitcher to deliver the 
ball to the bat without delivering it. 

SEC. 2. Any delivery of the ball to the bat while his (pivot) 
foot is not in contact with the Pitcher's plate, as defined in 
Rule 29. 

SEC. 3. Any motion in delivering the ball to the bat by the 
Pitcher while not in the position defined in Rule 29. 

Sec. 4. The holding of the ball by the Pitcher so long as to 
delay the game unnecessarily. 



f 



38 



PLAYING RULES. 



DEAD BALLS. 

Rui.E 33. A Dead Ball is a ball delivered to the bat by the 
Pitcher that touches any pari of the Batsman's person or cloth- 
ing while standing in his position without being struck at ; or 
that touches any part of the Umpire's person or clothing while 
he is standing on foul ground, without first passing the 
Catcher. 

Ki i.k 3(_ In caseof a Foul Strike, Foul Hit ball not legally 
caught out, Dead Hall, or Base Runner put out for being struck 
by a fair hit ball, the ball shall not be considered in play until 
it is held by the Pitcher standing in his position, and the 
Umpire shall have called play. 

BLOCK BALLS. 

Rule 35. Section' i. A Block is a batted or thrown ball 
that is touched, stopped or handled by any person not engaged 
in the game. 

Sec. 2. Whenever a Block occurs the Umpire shall declare 
it, and Base Runners may run the basts without being put out 
until the ball has been returned to and held by the Pitcher 
standing in his position. 

Sec. 3. In the case of a Block, if the person not engaged in 
the game should retain posssession of the ball, or throw or kick 
it beyond the reach of the F'ielders, the Umpire should call 
"Time," and require inch l!ase Runner to stop at the last base 
touched by him until the ball be returned to die Pitcher stand- 
ing in his position, anil the Umpire shall have called "play." 
THE BATSMAN'S BOSITION — (iKI)IK OF BATTING. 

Rule 36. The Batsmen must take their positions within the 
Batsmen's Lines, as defined in Rule io, in (he order in which 
they a-re named in the batting order, which batting order must 
be submitted by the Captains of the opposing learns to the Um- 
pire before the game, and this batting order must be followed 
pi in the case of a substitute player, in which case the 
substitute must take the place of the original player in the 
batting order. After the first inning the first si riker in each 
inning shall be the batsman whose name follows that of the 
man who has completed his turn — time at bat — in the pre- 
• eding inning. 

Kile 37. SECT ion i. When their side goes to the bat the 
players must immediately return to the players' bench, as de- 
(ined in Rule 20, and remain there until the side is put out, ex- 
cept when batsmen or base runners; provided, that the Captain 
and one assistant only may occupy the space between the Play- 
. is' Lines and the Captain's Fine-;, to coach base runners. 

SEC. 2. No player of the side "at bat, "except when batsman, 
>hall occupy any portion of the space within the Catcher's 
Lines, as defined in Rule 3. The triangular space behind the 



PLAYING RULES. 



3') 



Home Base is reserved for the exclusive use of Umpire, 
Catcher and Batsman, and the Umpire must prohibit any 
player of the side "at bat" from crossing the same at any 
time while the ball is in the hands of or passing between the 
Pitcher and Catcher, while standing in their positions. 

Sec. 3. The players of the side "at bat" must occupy the 
portion of the field allotted them, but must speedily vacate any 
portion thereof that may be in the way of the ball, or any 
Fielder attempting to catch or field it. 

THE BATTING RULES. 

Rule 38. A Fair Hit is a ball batted by the Batsman, stand- 
ing in his position, that first touches any part of the person of a 
player or umpire or falls within the foul lines, that (whether it 
first touches Foul or Fair Ground) bounds or rolls within the 
Foul Lines, between Home and First, or Home and Third 
Bases, without interference by a player. 

Hule 39. A Foul Hit is a ball batted by the Batsman, 
standing in his position, that first touches the ground, any part 
of the person of a player, or any object behind either of the 
Foul Lines, or that strikes the person of such Batsman, while 
standing in his position, or batted by the Batsman, standing in 
his position, that (whether it first touches Foul or Fair Ground) 
bounds or rolls outside the Foul ^.ines, between Home and 
First, or Home and Third Bases, without interference by a 
player : J'rovicled, that a Foul Hit ball not rising above the 
Batsman's head, and caught by the Catcher playing within ten 
feet of the Home Base, shall be termed a Foul Tip. 

Rule 40. A Bunt Hit is a deliberate attempt on the part of 
tin batsman to hit a ball slowly within the infield so that i 
cannot be fielded by any infielder in time to retire the batsman. 

HALLS BATTED OUTSIDE THE GROUNDS. 

RULE 41. When a batted ball passes outside the grounds, 
the Umpire shall decide it Fair should it disappear within, or 
Foul should it disappear outside of the range of the Foul 
Lines, and Rules 38 and 39 arc to be construed accordingly. 

Rule 42. A Fair batted ball that goes over the fence shall 
entitle the batsman to a home run, except that should it go 
over the fence at a less distance than two hundred and thirty- 
five feet from the Home Base, when he shall be entitled to two 
bases only, and a distinctive line shall be marked on the fence 
at this point. 

STRIKES. 

RULE 43. A Strike is : 

Section i. A ball struck at by the Batsman without its 
touching his bat ; or 



•4o 



PLAYING r 



Sf.c. 2. A Fair Ball legally delivered by the Pitcher, J.ut 
not struck at by the Batsman. 

Sec. 3. Any obvious attempt to make a Foul Kit. 

SEC. 4. A Foul Hit, other than a foul tip, made by the Hats- 
man while attempting a bunt hit, as defined in Rule 40, that 
falls or rolls upon foul ground between Home base and 
Base or Home base and Third B 

SEC. 5. A ball struck at, if the ball touches any part of the 
Batsman's person. 

SBC. 6. A ball tipped by the Batsman and caught by the 
catcher within the 10-foot lines. 

RULE 44. A Foul Strike is a ball batted by the Batsman 
when any part of his person is upon ground outside the lines of 
the Batsman's position. 

THE BATSMAN IS OUT. 

Rule 45. The Batsman is out : 

SECTION I. If he fails to take his position at the bat in his 
order of batting, unless the error be discovered and the proper 
Batsman takes his position before a time "at bat" re- 
corded ; and in such case the balls and strikes called must be 
counted in the time "at bat " of the proper batsman, and only 
the proper Batsman shall be declared out : Provided, this rule 
shall not lake effect unless the cut is declared before the ball is 
delivered to the succeeding Batsman, and no runs shall be 
scored or bases run, and further, no outs shall be counted other 
than that of the proper Batsman. 

SEC. 3. If he fails to take his position within one minute 
after the Umpire has called for the Bat-man. 

3. If he makes a Foul Hit other than a Foul Tip, as 

defined in Rule 3<;, and the ball be momentarily held by a 

Fielder before touching the ground, provided it be not caught 

in a Fielder's hat or cap, or touch some object Other than a 

der, before I .lit. 

SEC. 4. If he makes a Foul Strike. 

5- If he attempts to binder the Catcher from fielding 
or throwing the ball by stepping outside the lines of his posi- 
tion, or otherwise obstructing or interfering witli the player. 

SEC. 6. If, while the First Base be occupied by a base 
runner, three strikes be called on him by the Umpire, except 
when two men are already out. 

Ski-. 7. If, after two strikes have been called, the Batsman 
obviously attempts to make a foul hit, as in Rule 43, Section 3. 

SEC. B. If, while attempting a third strike, the ball touches 
any part of the batman's person, in which case base runners 
occupying bases shall return, as prescribed in Rule 49, Section 5. 

SEC. 9. If he hits a fly ball that can he handled by an i:i- 



^sV 



TLAYING RULES. 



4t 



fielder while first and second bases are occupied, or first, second 
and third, with only one out. 

Sec. io. If the third strike is called in accordance with 
Section 4, Rule 43, in such case the Umpire shall, as soon as 
the ball is hit, declare infield or outfield hit. 

BASK RUNNING RULES. 

WHEN -NIK BATSMAN BECOMES A BASE RUNNER. 

Rule 46. The Batsman becomes a Base Runner : 



I. Instantly after he makes a Fair Hit. 

Instantly after four balls have been called by the 



Section 
Sec. 2. 
Umpire. 

Sic 3. Instantly after three strikes have been decided by 
the Umpire. 

Six. 4. If, while he be a Iiatsman, without making any 
attempt to strike, his person — excepting hands or forearm, 
which makes it a dead hall— or clothing be hit by a ball from 
the Pitcher ; unless, in the opinion of the Umpire, he intention- 
ally permits himself to be so hit. 

Sic. 5. Instantly after an illegal delivery of a ball by the 
Pitcher. 

BASES TO BE TOUCHED. 
RULE .47. Tin' Base Runner must touch each base in regular 
order, vi/.., hirst, Second, Third and Home Bases, and when 
obliged to return (except on a foul hit) must retouch the base 
or bases in reverse "order. lie shall only be considered as 
holding a base after touching it, and shall then be entitled to 
hold such base until he has legally touched the next base in 
order, or has been legally forced to vacate it for a succeeding 
Base Runner. 

ENTITLED TO BASES. 
RULE 48. The Base Runner shall be entitled, without being 
put out, to take the base in the following cases : 

SECTION I. If, while he was Batsman, the Umpire called 
four balls. 

SEC, 2. If the Umpire awards a succeeding batsman a base 
on four balls, or for being hit with a pitched ball, or in case of 
an illegal delivery — as in Rule 46, Section 5 — and the Base 
Runner is thereby forced to vacate the base held by him. 
SEC, 3. If the Umpire calls a "balk." 

SEC. 4. If a ball, delivered by the Pitcher, pass the Catcher 
and touch the Umpire, or any fence or building within ninety 
feet of the Home Base. 

Sec. 5. If, upon a fair hit, the ball strikes the person or 
clothing of the Umpire on fair ground. 

SEC. (>. If he be prevented from making a base by the 
obstruction of an adversary. 



Q2 PI.AYINC RUI.KS. 

Sec. 7. If tlie Fielder stop nr catch a batted ball with Ins 

any part of his dress. 

RETURNING TO HA 

RULE 49. The Base Runner shall return to his base, and 
shall be entitled to so return without being pnl oul : 

SECTION I. If the Umpire declares a Foul Tip (as defined 
in Kul.- 39), or any other Foul Hit not legally caught bya fielder. 

Ski-. 2. If the Umpire declares a Foul Strike. 

Sec. 3. If the Umpire declares a Dead Ball, unless it be also 
the fourth Unfair Ball and he he thereby forced to take the 
next base, as provided in Rule 48, Section 2. 

SEC. 4. If the person or clothing of the Umpire interferes 
with the Catcher, or he is struck by a ball thrown by the Catcher 
to intercept a Base Runner. 

SEC. 5. The Rase Runner shall return to his base, if, while 
attempting a strike, the ball touches any part of the Batsman's 
person. 

WHEN BASS RUMMERS AK1. <.t 1. 

RULE 50. The Base Runner is out: 

SEC! [ON I. If, after three strikes have been declared against 
him while Batsman, and the Catcher fail to catch the third 
strike ball, he plainly attempts to hinder the Catcher from 
fielding the ball. 

SEC, 2. If, having made a lair Hit while Batsman, such fair 
bit ball be momentarily held by a Fielder before touching the 
ground, or any object other than a Fielder; Provided, it be not 
caught in a Fielder's hat or cap. 

3. If, when the Umpire has declared three strikes on 
him while Batsman, the third strike ball be momentarily held 
by a Field' tuching the ground: Provided, it be not 

caught in a Fielder's hat or cap, or touch some object other 
thai, a Fielder, before being .aught. 

SEC, 4. If, after Three Strik.-s or a lair Hit, he be touched 
with the ball in the hand of a- Fielder before he shall have 
touched First Base. 

5- If, after Three Strikes or a Fair Hit, the ball be 
securely held by a Fielder while touching h: I Base with any 
part of hi- | rcsucb base Runner touches Kirs! 

Sl '■' ■ ''■ ,f . ''I running the last half of the distance from 
Ii "" 1 I ise, while the ball is being fielded to First 

he runs outside the three-foot line*, as defined in Rule 7, 
unless to avoid a Fielder attempting to held a Hatted Rail. 

SEC. 7. If, 111 running from F11 Base, from 

Second to Third Rase, or from Third to Horn. runs 

more than three feet from a direct line between such bfl 
avoid being touched by the ball in the hands of a 1:. 
but mease a Fielder be occupying the Base Runner's proper 



ML 



PLAYING 1 



43 



path, in attempting to field a batted ball, then the Base Runner 
shall run out of the path, and behind said Fielder, and shall 
not be declared out for so doing, 

Six'. 8. If he fails to avoid a Fielder attempting to field a 
batted ball, in the manner described in Sections 6 ami 7 of this 
Rule; or if he in any way obstructs a Fielder attempting to 
field- 1 , batted ball, or intentionally interferes with a thrown 
ball: Provided, that if two or more 1 i Id' 10 field a 

batted ball, and the Ba e Runner comes in contact with one or 
more of them, the Umpire shall determine which Fielderis 
entitled to the benefit of this hall nut decide the 

Base Runner out for coming in contact with any other fielder. 

. '). If, at anytime while tin- ball is in play, hi 
touched by the ball in the hands ..f a Fielder, unless some part 
of his person is touching a base he is entil upy : Pro- 

. the ball be held by the Fielder after touching him ; but 
(exception as to First Base), in running to e he may 

overrun said base, without being put out for being off said base, 
after first touching it, provided he returns at once and ret. niches 
the base, after which he may be put out as at any other base. 
K, in overrunning First Base, hi also mpts to run to Si 
Base, or, after passing the base he turn-, to his left from the 
foul line, he shall forfeit such exemption from being put out. 

Sec. 10. If, when a lair or foul Hit ball (other than a foul 

tip as refened to in Rule 39) is legally caught by a Fielder, 
such ball is legally held by a Fielder on the base occupied by 
the Base Runner when such ball was struck (or the Rase Run- 
ner be touched with the ball in the hands of a Fielder), before 
he retouches said base after such hair or Foul Hit ball v. 
caught : Provided, that the liase Runner shall not be out in 
sben case, if. after the ball was legally caught as al 
delivered to the bat by tin- I'ili Ini 1 r holds it 

on said base, or touches the Base Runner with it ; but if the 
Base Runner in attempting to reach a base, detaches it before 
being touched or forced out, he shall be declared safe. 

Sis. 11. Lf, when a Batsman a liase Runner, the 

First liase, or the First and Second Bases, or the First, s 
and Third Bases, be occupied, any Base Runner so occupying 

a base shall cease to be entitled to hold il, until any following 

Base Runner is put out, and may be put oul at the next h. 

by being touched by the ball in the hands of a Fielder in the 
same manner as in running to Inst liase, at anytime 
any following liase Runner is put out. 

. 12. If a Fair Hit ball strike him before touchin 
Fielder, and in such case no base shall be run unless [„;, 
the Batsman becoming a Base Runner, and no run shall be 
scored ; or any other liase Runner put out. 






44 



PI.AY1NC, RIM ■ 



Sec. 13. If, when running to a base or forced to return to a 
base, he fail to touch the intervening base or bases, if any, in 
the order prescribed in Rule 47, he may be put out at the base 
he fails to touch, or being touched by the ball in the hands of 
a Fielder, in the same manner as in running to hirst Base : 
Provided, th&t the Base Runner shall not be out in such case if 
the ball be delivered to the bat by the Pitcher In-fore the 
Fielder holds it on said baseortouche 1 the Ba re Runner with it. 
. 14. If. when the Umpire calls "Play," after any sus- 
pension of a game, he fails to return to and touch the base he 
occupii "Time" was called before touching the next 

base : Provided, the Base Runner shall not be out in such case 
if the ball be delivered to the bat by the Pitcher before the 
Fielder holds it on said base or touchesthe Base Runner with it. 
WHEN BATSMAN OR BASK RUNNER IS OUT. 

Rut.E 51. The Umpire shall declare the Batsman or Base 

Runner out, without waiting for an appeal for such decision, 

in all cases where such player is put out in accordance with 

these rules, except as provided in Rule 50, Sections 10 and 14. 

COACHING I ES. 

RULE 52, Thi shall be restricted to coaching the 

Case Runner only, ami shall not be allowed to address any 
remarks except to the liasc Runner, and then only in wo: 
necessary direction ; ami shall not use language which will in 
any manner refer to or reflect upon a player of the opposing 
club, the Umpire or the spectators, and not more than two 
eoachers, who may be one player participating in tbe game and 
any other player under contract to it, in lie uniform of either 
club, shall be allowed at any one time. To enforce the above, 
he Captain of the opposite side may call the attentionof the 
Umpire to the offence, ami upon a repetition of the same, the 
offending player shall be di >ra further participation in 

the game and shall leave the playing field forthwith. 
•I lit: SCORING OF RUNS. 

RULE 53. One run shall be scored every time a Base Run- 
ner, after having legally touched the lust tin , shall 
tlo- Home Base before three men are put out. 
(Exception) If the third man is forced out, or is put out be- 
reaching hirst Base, a run shall not be scored. 

THE UMPIRE. 
RULE 54. The Umpire shall not be changed .luring ti. 
progress of a game, except for reason of illness or injury. 
HIS POWERS AND JURISDICTION. 

Rllk 55. Suction i. The Umpire is master of the Field 
from the commencement to the termination of thegame, and is 
entitled to the respect of the spectators, and any person offer- 



PLAYING l 



45 



ing any insult or indignity to him must be promptly ejected 
from the grounds. 

Sic. 2. He must be invariably addressed by the players as 
Mr. Umpire; and he must compel the players to observe the 
ions of all the Playing Rules, and he is hereby invested 
with authority to order any player to do or omit to do any acl 
as he may deem necessary to give force and effect to an ) and 
all such provisions. 

SPEC! VI hi iiks. 
RULE 56. The Umpire's duties shall be as follows: 
SECTION I. The Umpire is the sole and absolute judge of 
play. In no instance shall any person, except the Captains of 
the competing teams, be allowed to address him or question his 
decisions, and they can only question him on an interpretation 
of the rules. No manager or any other officer of either club 
shall be permitted to go on the field or address the Umpire, 
under a penalty of a forfeiture of a game. 

SEC. 2. Before the commencement of a game the Umpire 
shall see that the rules governing all the materials of the game 
are strictly observed, lie shall ask the captain of the home 
club whether there are any special ground rules to be enforced, 
and if there are, he shall see that they are duly enforced, pro- 
vided they 'I., no! conflicl with any of these rules. 

SEC. 3. The Umpire must keep the contesting nines playing 
nitly from the commencement of the game to its termina- 
tion, allowing such delays only as are rendered unavoidable by 
accident, injury or rain. He must, until the completion of the 
game, require the players of each side to promptly take their 
positions in the field as soon as the third man is put out, and 
must require the first striker of the opposite side to be in his 
position at the bat as soon as ilie fielders are in their plai 

Sec 4. The Umpire 5] .all every "Unfair 

Ball" delivered by the l';i' very "Dead hail," if also 

an unfair ball, as a " Ball," and he shall count and call every 
"Strike." Neither a "Ball" Bora " Strike " shall be counted 
or called until the ball has passed the Home Hasc. lie shall 
also declare every " I >ead Ball," " Block," " Foul Hit," " Foul 
Strike" and "Balk," "Infield" or "Outfield Hit," 
bed in Rule 45, Section 9. 

c A.LL1NG " PLAY " AM) " TIM1 ." 
RULE 57. The Umpire must call "Play" promptly at the 
hour designated by the Home Chili, ami 01, the call of " Play" 
the game must immediately begin. When he calls " Time " 
play shall be suspended until he calls " 1'lay " again, and dur- 
ing the interim no player shall be put oat, base be run or run 
be scored. The Umpire shall suspend play only for an acci- 




FLAYING RUJ.ES. 

dent to himself or a player (bat incase of accident to a Fielder 
"Time" shall not be called until the ball be returned to and 
held by the Pitcher, standing in his position), or in case rain 
falls so heavily that the spectators are compelled, by the sever- 
ity of the storm, to seek shelter, in which case he shall note the 
time of suspension, and should such rain continue to fall thirty 
minutes thereafter, he shall terminate the game ; or to enforce 
order in case of annoyance from spectator . 

RULE 58. The Umpire is only allowed, by the rules, to call 
"Time" in case of an accident to himself or a player, a "Block" 
as referred to in Rule 35, Section 3, or in case of rain, as defined 
by the rule. 

RULE 59. SECTION I. The Umpire shall remove from the 
game and the field any player guilty of indecent or vulgar 
language or conduct, and in addition thereto the player shall be 
lined the sum of 8-5. 

Rule 60. Section i. The Umpire is authorized to impose 
a line of not less than $5, nor more than §10, during the progress 
of a game, as follows : For the Captain, Coacher, or any player 
of the contesting teams failing to remain within the bounds of 
his position as defined in these rules. This, however, shall not 
deprive the Captain of either team from appealing to the Um- 
pire upon a question involving an interpretation of the rules. 

SEC. 2. For the disobedience by a player of any order of the 
Umpire, or any violation of these rules. 

SEC 3. If a player is guilty of a second violation of this 
rule the Umpire shall impose a fine of J25 and, in his discre- 
tion, order the player from the game and the field. For a 
third offense the Umpire must positively order the player from 
the field, and forthwith notify the Captain of the team to which 
the player belongs that during the continuance of the game he 
he will impose no further lines but instantly remove any player 
guilty of a violation of any of these rules. 

Sec. 4. Winn the Umpire orders a player from the game 
he shall also insist upon the player's removal from the field, 
and suspend play until this order is obeyed. 

Sec. 5. Immediately upon notification by tin- I'm pi re that a 
fine has been imposed upon any Manager, Captain or player 
the Secretary shall forthwith notify the person so fined, and 
also the club of which he is a member, and in the event of the 
failure of the person SO fined to pay to the Secretary the amount 
of said line within five days of notice, he shall be debarred 
from participation in any championship game until such fine is 
paid. 

I 1 1- 1 D RUL1 . 

Rule 61"! No club shall allow open betting or pool-selling 
upon its ground, nor i.i any building owned or occupied by it. 




PLAYING RULES, 



47 



RULE 62. No person shall be allowed upon any part of the 
field during the progress of the game in addition to the players 
in uniform, the Manager on each side and the Umpire except 
such officers of the law as may be present in uniform and such 
"Mm ials of the home club as may be necesary to preserve the 

1 ' 

Rui.k 63. No Umpire, Manager, I aptain or player shall 
address the spectators during the progress of the game, except 
in case of necessary explanation. 

Rule 64. Every club shall furnish sufficient police force 
upon its own grounds to preserve order, and in the event of a 
crowd entering the field during the progress of a game, and 
interfering with the play in any manner, the visiting club may 
refuse to play further until the field be cleared. If the ground 
be not cleared within fifteen minutes thereafter, the visiting 
club may claim, and shall be entitled to the game by a score 
of nine runs to none (no matter what number of innings have 
been played). 

GENERAL DEFINITIONS. 

Rut. E 65. " Play " is the order of the Umpire to begin the 
game, or to resume play after its suspension. 

Rule 66. "Time" is the order of the Umpire to suspend play. 
Such suspension must not extend beyond the day of the game. 

Rule 67. "Game" is the announcement by the Umpire 
that the game is terminated. 

RULE 68. An "Inning" is the term at bat of the nine play- 
ers representing a club in a game, and is completed when 
three of such players have been put out, as provided in these rules. 

Rule 69. A "Time at Bat" is the term at bat of a Bats- 
man. It begins when he takes his position, and continues 
until he is put out or becomes a base runner ; except when, be- 
cause of being hit by a pitched ball, or in case of an illegal 
delivery by the Pitcher, or in ease ,,f a sacrifice hit purposely 
made to the infield which, not being a base hit, advances a 
base runner without resulting in a put out, except to the B 
man, as in Rule 45. 

Rule 70. "Regal" or "Legally" signifies as required by 
these rules. 

SCORING. 

Rule 71. In order to promote uniformity in scoring cham- 
pionship games the following instructions, suggestions and 
definitions are made for the benefit of scorers, and they ate 
required to make all scores in accordance therewith. 
BATTING, 

Section i. The first item in the tabulated score, after the 
player's name and position, shall be the number of times he 
has been at bat during game. The time or times when the 




■ 5 PLAYINC RULES. 

player has been sent lo base by being hit by a pitched ball, by 
the Pitcher's illegal delivery, or by a base on bails, shall not he 
included in this column. 

Sec. 2. In the second column should be set down the runs 
made hy each player. 

SEC. 3. In the third column should he placed the first base 
hits made by each player. A base hit should be scored in the 
following ca 

When the ball from the bat strikes the ground within the 
foul lines, and out of reach of the Fieli 

When a hit ball is partially or wholly stopped by a Fielder 
in motion, but such playei cannot recover himself in time to 
handle the ball before the striker reaches first Base. 

When a hit ball is hit so sharply to an tnfielder that he can- 
not handle it in time to put out the Batsman. In case of doubt 
over this class of hits, score a base bit, and exempt the Fielder 
from the < b$rge of an error. 

When a ball is hit SO slowly toward a Fielder that he cannot 
handle it in lime to put out the Batsman. 

That in all cases where a Base Runner is retired by being hit 
by a batted ball, the Batsman should be credited with a base hit. 

When a ! ul led ball hits the person or clothing of the Umpire, 
as defined in Rule 48, Section 5. 

SEC. 4, In the fourth column shall be placed Sacrifice Hits, 
which shall be credited to the Batsman, who, when no 01 
out, or when but one man is out, advances a Runner a base by 
a bunt sacrifice hit, which residts in putting out the Batsman, 
or would so result if the ball were handled without error. 

I-'IKI ! 

SEC. 5. The number of opponents put out by each player 
shall be set down in the fiflh Column, Where a Batsman is 
given out by the Umpire for a foul strike, or where the Bats- 
man fails to bat in proper order, the put out shall be scored to 
the ('all her. 

Sec. 6. The number of times the player assists shall beset 
down in the ixth column. An assist should be given to each 
player who handles the ball in assisting a run out or other play 
nf the kind. 

\« assist should be given to a player who makes a play in 
time to put a runner out, even if the player who could com- 
e the play fails, through no fault of the player assisting. 

And generally an assist should be given to each player who 

handles or assists in any manner in handling the ball from the 

it leaves the bat until it reaches the player who makes the 

put out, or in case of a thrown ball, to each player wdio throws 

ndles it cleanly, and in such a way that a put-out result;, 

er would result if no error n ceiver. 



PLAYING HULLS. 



4') 



ERRORS. 
Skc. 7. An error shall be given in the seventh column f r 
each mi splay which allows the striker or base runner to make 
one o-r more bases when perfect play would have insured his 
heingput out, except that "wild pitches," "base onfalls," 
hases on the batsman being struck by a "pitched ball," or in 
case of illegal pitched balls, balks and passed balls, shall not 
he included in Said Column. In scoring errors of batted balls 
see Section 3 of this rule. 

SEC. 8. Stolen Bases shall be scored as follows: 
Any attempt to steal a base must go to the credit of the Base 
Runner, whether the ball is thrown wild or muffed by the 
fielder, but any manifest error is to be charged to the fielder 
making the same. If the Base Runner advances another base 
he shall not be credited with a stolen base, and the fielder 
allowing the advancement is also to be charged with an error. 
If the Base Runner makes a start and a battery error is made, 
the runner secures the credit of a stolen base, and the battery 
error is scored against the player making it. Should a Base 
Runner overrun a base and then be put out, he shall receive the 
credit for the stolen base. If a Base Runner advances a base 
on a fly out, or gains two bases on a single base hit, or an infield 
out, or attempted out, he shall be credited with a stolen base. 
provided there is a possible chance and a palpable attempt made 
to retire him. 

EARNED KUNS. 
Sec. 9. An earned run shall be scored every time the player 
reaches the home base unaided by errors before chances have 
been offered to retire the side. 

THE SUMMARY. 
ROLE 72. The Summary shall contain: 

SECTION I. The number of earned runs made by each side. 

SEC. 2. The number of two-base hits made by each player. 

3> The number of three-base hits made by each player. 

I- The number of home runs made by each player. 

SEC, 5. The number of bases stolen by each player. 

Sec. 6. The number of double and triple plays made by each 
side, and the names of the players assisting in the same. 

Sec, 7. The number of men given bases on called balls by 
each Pitcher. 

Sec. 8. The number of men given bases from being hit by 
pitched balls. 

•i- 1'he number of men struck out. 

SEC. 10. The number of passed balls by each Catcher. 

Sec. 11. The number of wild pitches by each Pitcher. 

Sir. 12. The time of Cam, . 

Skc. 13. The name of the Umpire. 



f 




INDEX TO RULES AND REGULATIONS. 



The Ground, 

The Field, 

Catcher's Lines, 

Foul Lines, . 

Players' Lines, 

The Captains' and Coachcrs' I i 

Three-foot Line, 

Pitcher's Plate, 

'I he Bases, . . 

batsman's Lines, 

The I tome Base, 

First, Second and Third liases. 

Lines must be Marked, 

The Ball, 

Weight and Size, 

Number Halls Furnished, 

Furnished by Home Club, 

Replaced if Injured, 
The Bat, .... 

Material of ... 

Shape of ... 

THE PLAYERS AM' THEIR 

Number of Players in Game, 
Players' Positions, 
Players not to Sit with Spectators, 
Club Uniforms, 

I loves, .... 

Players' Benches, 

'! HE GAME 
Time of Championship Game, 
Number of 1 u 
Termination of Game, 
The Winning Run, 
A Tie Game, 
A Drawn Game, 
A Called Game, 
A Fort . 

Failure of the Nine to A] 

:] of One Side to Play, . 

Fail-. i ng, 

If a Ti to Dilatoi y : 

Wilful Violation, 

i a Remove I 

Writti President, 

No i iamc, ..... 

Substitutes, ..... 

■ More Substitute Players, 
Fxir.i Player, .... 

.' . 

Choice of Innings Condition o(C 
The Pitcher's Position, 
Delivery of the Ball I 

Unfair Ball, .... 

Balking, 

■ ■ 
r '°°t N • with Pitchi 

Pitcher Outside of Lines, 

A Dead Ball, 

A Foul Strike, 

Block Balls, .... 
Stopped by Person not in I 

Ball Returned, . 





l 




2 




8 




4 




B 




G 




y 




8 




9 




10 




1] 




IS 




18 




11 


.11 


11 


. 


11 


CI. 


14 


(4) 


14 




15 


. . 'I> 


15 


. 


15 


'OSITIONS. 






16 




is 


1 


19 


. 


19 




20 


. 


21 


. 


2 I 


(a) 


21 


. 


n 




a 




IS 




21 




25 


a 




. 


as 


■ 


•j.-, 


4 


■r. 


■ 


25 


■ 


25 


. 






M 




2? 


. ii. 


Si 


. 


2T 


.:i. 


27 




28 




at 




:*> 




81 




:S2 


(i) 


88 


IS) 




. 


:i2 


.i 






:« 




34 






. ' . ii 


88 


(2j 


as 



Base-Runner Must Stop, 
The B 'osition— Order of Batting, 

yen must Remain, 
;e Resei ved for I : mpire, 

Spa< b Allotted Players " ai Rat," 
Bat hi ■ Rules— Fair Hit, 

Foul Hit, 

Hunt Hit, 

Batted Ball Outsi unds, 

A fair Batted Ball, ..... 

Strikes, ...... 

Hail Struck ai by Bal iroan. 

Fair Ball I 'elivered by Pitcher, 

■\i tempi to Make Foul Hit, . 

[ h while At tern] ting a Hunt Hit, 
B ill Strut I. ai after Touching Batsman's Persoi 
Hall Tipped by Batsman, 
A Foul Strike, ... 

■ man is Out, . 

Falling; to Take Position at Bal in Order, 
Failure to Take Position within One Minute 

! 

If He Makes a Foul Hit. 
If He Makes a Foul Strike, 
Attempt to Hinder * Iat< her, 
Three Strikes Called l>v Umpire, 

Attempt to Make a Foul Hit After Two Strikes h; 
Called, 

If Ball Hits Him While Making Third Strike, 

li He Hits a Fly Ball thai can he 11 indl< d by Infield 

First Base Occupied with Only I »neOut, 
U Third Strike is Called, 

BASE RUNNING RULES 

The Batsman Bei Runner, . 

After a Fair Hit, 

After Four B till are I ..lied. 

After ThreeStrikes are Declared, 

If Hit by Hall While at Bat, 

After Illegal Delivery of Ball, 
Bases to be Touched, ..... 

K.ntiti' to Bases, . 

If Umpire Calls Four Ball 

If Umpire Award Second Batsn i i r ■ ■ 

li UmpireCalls Balk, 

It Pitcher's Ball Passes Catcher, 

Ball Strikes Umpire, 

Prevented 1 (taking T 

Fieldei Stops Ball, .... 

Returning to Bases, .... 

[f Foul Tip, 

If Foul Strike, .... 

If Dead Ball. 

I f Person of Umpire interferes with Catcher, 
If the Ball Touches the Batsman \ V i on, 

Ha-.. Kuiin-r Out, .... 

\ i tempt to 1 Eindei < !ati hei fi Fit Idi (ig Ball, 

II Fielder ll.dd Fair Hit Ball, 
TfairdStrike Ball Held by Fielder, 

! bed with Ball After Three Strikes, 

Touching First Base, .... 

Running from l [■ :. 

Running from Fii to . 

Failure to Avoid Fielder, 

Touched by Ball While in Fla> , . 



R 


I.K. 




85 




■m 




■n 




s? 




87 




88 




89 




40 




II 




IS 




1.) 


. ' rn 


i:i 


r: 


43 


18) 


Li 


1 


18 




18 




18 




14 




49 


(1) 


« 


I I'eing 






4.", 




45 


(« 


45 




!.-> 


(6) 


45 


ive been 




i:, 


45 


(8) 


15 


ler while 




9 


45 


(IS 


45 




V, 


. ii) 


46 


. 


46 


. (8) 


46 


1 


46 


ISJ 


M 




IT 




is 




In 


- ■; 


IS 


: 


IS 


. (4) 


IS 


51 


IS 


161 




(7) 


48 




49 


. ' '1) 


111 


(8) 


49 


(.■!, 


49 


■ tib 


49 


:,, 


19 




SO 


1) 


60 


[333 




' 




1 




:,. 


50 




90 


Ti 


50 




50 




50 



V 




Fair or Foul Hit Caught by Fielder, 
, .t Bate Runner, 

Touched by Hi: Ball Before Touching 

Rum Base, 

Umpire Calls Play, .... 
When Jiatsinan or Base Runner is Out, 
Coaching Rules, . 

Scoring of Runs, ..... 

THE UMPIRE. 

The Umpire, .... 

When Master of the Field, 

■ i ranee of PI i 
Special 1 luttes, ..... 

;.; of Hay, 

Shall See Rules Observed Befon ing Game, 

Must Keep Contesting Nina 
Must Count and Call Balls, 
Umpire Must Call Play, . 

■ Allowed to Call Time, 
Umpire li Lmpowered to Inflict Fines, 
[uage. 
Wilful Failure of Captain to Remain within 
Disobedience of a Player, 
Repetition of Offences, 
Player Must Re Removed from the Field, 
Shall Notify Person Fined, 

FIELD RULES. 

No Club Shall Allow Open Betting, 

ball be Allowed in the 1 i 
Audience Shall \ -m1. 

Every Club Shall Furnish Police 



GENERAL DEFINITE >NS 



Bat, 



Play, 

Time, 
Game, 
An Inning 
A Time at 
Legal, 
Scoring, 

Battta 
Run 

. 
Sacrifii <■ Hits, 

Assists, 
Error*. 
Stolen 1 
Earned Runs, 
The Summary, 

Nunn i R lin , t 

Number ol I w. | 
Number oi I 
Number of Home Runt 
Numb.-r ol Stolen Hases, 
Number ol I 

on Called Balls, 
i 
Men Struck < tat, 
Passed Ball*. 
Wild P 
Time oi 
Name ul Umpire, 





Rdl«. 


MO) 


50 


(Hi 


50 


(181 


50 


(181 


50 


(14) 


50 



■1: 

(31 
til 

i) 



(i) 
(i) 

(4) 

(5) 



II 

ii) 

(4) 



ANNUAL MEETING OF mmtn OF DIRECTORS. 



53 



Annual Meeting of the Board of Directors. 



M. MEETING OF THE BOARD <>K DIRECTORS OF l ill 
NATIONAL LEAGUE AM) AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF 
PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CI UBS HELD AT 1 BE 
FIFTH AVENUE HOTEL, NEW YORK CITY, 
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 
1895. 
Meeting called to order at 10.20 o'clock A. \t. 
Present : 

N. E. Young, Chairman ; Messrs. Von der Ilorst, Brnsh, 
Soden, Ryrne, Von der Abe and Hart, Directors. 

The Secretary presented a tabular statement of. championship 
a won and lost during the season of 1895. On motion the 
following resolution was adopted : 

Resolved, That the Baltimore Base Ball Club, of Baltimore 
Md., having won the greatest percentage of games in the cham- 
pionship series, is hereby awarded the base ball championship 
of the United States for the year 1895. 

The report of the Treasurer was receive! and accepted. 
The Secretary submitted the appeals oi a number ol p] 1 
asking that fines imposed upon them during the season oi 
be remitted. On motion it was resolved that inasmuch as said 

fines were imposed in accordance with our rules, (his i 
not feel authorized to remit the ame, 

N. E. YOUNG, Chairman. 



Signed I. T. l'.KI sn, 

A. 11. SODEN, 

|. A. Hart, 
C. 11. Byrne, 
Chris. Von m b \ m 
11 K. Von dekHorst, 



Director!. 



54 



ANNUAL MEETING OF NATIONAL LEAG1 i. 



Annual Meeting of National League. 



ANNUAL MEETING OF THE NATIONAL LBAG1 I ami AMBRll AN 

ASSOCrATION OF PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLI BS HELD 

AT THE FIFTH AVENUE HOTEL, NEW yokk, 

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBEB 1 3, 1895. 

Meeting called to order at 1.35 >'• M - 

Present : 

A. II. Soden and J. B. Hillings, representing t he Boston 
Base Ball Association. 

C. Von der A lie and W. M. Ilezel, representing the St. Loui 
Base Ball Association. 

Andrew I- reedman, representing the National Exhibition 
Company of New York City. 

W. W. Kerr, representing the Pittsburg Athletic Company. 

F. De II. Robison, representing the Cleveland Ba>e ISall 
Company. 

Dr. 'I". II. StucUy and Harney Dreyfuss, representing the 
ille Base Ball Company. 

II. R. Von der Horst and Edward llanlon, representing the 
l.iltimon Base Ball and Exhibition Company. 

John I. Rogers and A. J. Reach, representing the Phila- 
ihia Hall ' 'lub. 

C. II. Byrne ami F. A. Abell, representing the Brooklyn 
Base Ball Club. 

|. T. Brush and N. A. Lloyd, representing the Cincinnati 
liase Hall Club. 

|. Earle Wagner, representing the National Washington Base 
Ball Club. 

James A. Hart, represent it ago Ball 1 lub. 



Ik 



ANNUAL MEETING OF NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



55 



On motion the reading of minutes of previous meetings was 
dispensed with. 

The report of the Board of Directors was received and 
accepted. 

The League proceeded to consider amendments to the 
League Constitution, which, as amended, was adopted as 
follows. (See Constitution.) 

On motion, adjourned to meet at II A. M. on the following 
day. 

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 180,5. 

Meeting called to order at 12 o'clock noon. 

The following resolution was adopted : 

Resohied, That the Rules Committee, when appointed, are 
requested to submit to this body an amendment to Rule 50., 
substantially abolishing the infliction of money fines, and em- 
powering umpires to remove from t lie game any player, who, 
after being once cautioned, continues to be guilty of violating 
any of the Rules, and in case of serious violation to remove him 
without such caution. 

The Secretary was directed to express the thanks of this 
body to the executors of the estate of the late Harry Wright 
for their kindness and promptness in carrying out his wishes 
as expressed in his last will, that all his base ball and cricket 
records and effects be presented to the National League. 

On motion, the Secretary was instructed to have prepared a 
list of all such records and effects, and present the same to the 
League at the Spring meeting. 

The following minute, submitted by Col. Rogers, was 
unanimously adopted, and the Secretary was directed to s 
the same upon the minutes of this organization, and present the 
family of Mr. Wright with an engrossed copy : 



"Tf 



56 ANNUAL MEETING OF NATIONAL M 



3n JHtinottoin. 
HARRY WRIGHT. 

It is meet and proper that this organization, at its first session held after 
the sad event, should formally record the death of Harry Wright, w 
almost two year* has been our Chief of Umpires, an office create 
nition of his invaluable lervices to and life-long connection with the national 
Same, an office of which he was the only incumbent, without predecessor or 
success-. r. 

But beyond this formal duty — which, sanctioned by immemorial custom, 
would devolve upon the dec-use of an ordinary associate — we feel that the 

>n and the man warrant a personal expression of the profoum 
of an immense constituency (trans as well as cia-Atlantic), of which we may 
be considered the official expon 

That universal grief founa vent not only in the fun • ind floral tomb 

offerings, but in the outpourings of saddened hearts and tributes from fond 
memories that measured their bereavements by depicting the greatness of the 
man and the lovableness of the friend they had lost. 

Had he greatness ? Not, perhaps, in its ordinary significance, as wor- 
shipped in the glare, glitter and tinsel of public life, accompanied by hurrahs 
ana drums and trumpets, but in its higher meaning he was truly great ; great 
■■he was good. Good to every one. Good at all times. Good in word, 

act and deed. Who can recall one harsh or unkind syllable uttered by Harry 

Wright ? Who can accuse him of one mean or dishonest transaction t When 

did he ever forget 1 1 Rule? flow many are the witnesses to his 

fairness, his impartiality, his effort to do right because it was right, his turn- 
ing away wrath by the softening of hi lis silence when he i 
not praise, bis proclivity for smoothing asperities and his preaching 1 
ennial gospel of peace ? His positive views and opinions, the deliberate out- 
growths of study and experience, were never pressed towards contention or 
quarrel. And so this man of amiable manners and sympathetic heart, serene- 
tempered, self-controlled and self-abnegated, so illumined the atmosphere of 
his surroundings that every one felt the better for the breathing of it and 
for the guidance of its kindly light. 

Hence he was lovable. Hence he had true greatness. 

Harry Wright had no enemy. His friends were legion, and included 
those to whom his voice and form were strangers, but whose name and fame 

He served in the ranks of il 
ball, and with Us development himself developed into leadership. The im- 
press of his personality is t raceable all through its growth to maturity, in its 
playing rules, on the diamond, in co-operative team work i"f which he was 
i . thing that refined and ennobled the gi 
, therefore, been truly said thai so Identified was he with 
the progress and popularity of the game that its history is his biography. 

"<-, - is xecoros, garnered 

by his life work anil love work, in becoming theif CUStodlan and in accepting 
the trust thus conferred on us by his I it, hereby seal this I 

mentofourlc emplar of all that is 

gentle and g<>o<i ,,, ni;iIlt aiK i M|lr ,. .,„,[ nonc8t in the realms of sports. Ktcr- 

hls memory. Rbquixscat in i' 



ANNUAL MKK.TINf. OF NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



57 



On motion it was agreed thai each club in this League be 
requested to play one game, on a uniform dale, prior to the 
commencement of the championship season, to be known as 
Harry Wright's Day, the gross receipts of such games to lie 
devoted to thl n tion of a monument to the memory of Harry 
Wright. 

On motion a committee of three, consisting of Messrs. Brush, 
Hart and Rogers, were appointed to make all necessary ar- 
rangements and have full charge of the details of such games. 

The League proceeded to the election of officers, with the 
following result, viz.: 

National Board— N. E. Young. C. H. Byrne, A. H. Soden, 
John T. Brush. 

Directors— II. R. Von der Horst, J. Sarle Wagner, Arthur 
II. Soden, James A. Hart, Dr. Tims. Hunt Stuoky and W. W. 
Kerr. 

The following amendment-, to the National Agreement were 
adopted. (See National Agreement.) 

The President appointed the following named gentlemen as 
members of the Rules Committee, viz, : AJberl J, Reach, Chris. 
Von der Ahe, Edward Ilanhm. 

The following resolutions were unanimously adopted: 

Ireil, That when this meeting adjourns it adjourn to 
meet in New York city on Monday, February 24, 1896. 

<lved. That the President "f this League is hereby re- 
quested and directed in his capacit) a, a Schedule Committee 
to so arrange the schedule for the coming season, so far as the 
acticable, that clubs desiring to play ball on Sunday 
shall be scheduled to commence their series on tin- lirst day of 
the week, so as not to conflict with the interests of clubs not 

scheduled for Sunday gam 
On motion adjourned. 

N. E. YOUN', 

President and Secretary, 



s« 



ANNUAL MEETING OF NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



Reconvened Annual Meeting; 






OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE ANIi AMERICAN ASSOCIATIATION Ot 
PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS, HELD AT THE FIFTH 
AVENUE HOTEL, NEW YORK CITY, 
FEBRUARY 24, I 

Meeting called to order at 3.50 p, m. 

Present : 

A. II. Sod en and \V. II. Conant, representing the Boston 

Base Hall Association. 

Waltei M. Ilezel, representing the St. Lonis Base ball 
Association. 

Andrew Freedman and J. W, Spalding, representing the 
National Exhibition Company. 

1). R. Ken. representing the Pittsburg Athletic Company. 

Edward Hanlon, representing the Baltimore Hase liall and 
Exhibition Company. 

Dr. Thomas Hunt Stucky, representing the Louisville Base 
Ball Company. 

A. J. Reach and John I. Rogers, representing the Phila- 
delphia liall Club. 

James A. Hart, representing the Chicago League Ball I 

F. A. Abell and Charles II. Byrne, representing the Brooklyn 
Base Ball Club. 

a T. Brush, representing the Cincinnati Base Ball Club. 
J. Earle Wagner, representing the National Washington Base 
Ball Club. 

F. lie II. Robison, representing the Cleveland Ball Club. 

tin motion the reading of the minutes of the previ 
ing was dispensed with. 

An amended National Agreement which met the unanimous 

approval of the National Board was submitted by the said 

I. After a full and free consideration and discussion and 

the adoption of amendments, it was unanimously adopted as 

(..Hows. (See National Agreement.) 



ANNUAL MEETING oK NATIONAL USAGI I. 



5') 



Tlic following amendment to Sec. 9 of Art. 8 of the League 
Constitution adding the words to said section "Or any violation 
■>f the provisions of the National Agreement" was adopted. 

On motion adjourned to meet at 10 o'clock A. M. on the fol- 
lowing day. 

I I'KSHAV, FEBRUARY 2?. I B96, 

Meeting called to order at II. SO A. M. 

The Committee on flaying Rules submitted their report, 
which, as amended, was adopted, as follows. (See Playing 

Rules.) 
The Secretary was instructed to add the following words to 

-', Rule 14: "At no time shall the ball be intentionally 
discolored by rubbing it with the soil or otherwise." 

The unanimous consent was given Mr. Rojbison to loan the 

Temple Cup to the Sportsmen's Association of New York for 
exhibition. 

The National Base Hall Club oi Washington, D. C, pre- 
sented the following communh u 

■ ■ 1 .adelphia, Pa., Feb. 25, 1896. 

"Wheveas, the National Base Ball Club of Washington, 
0. <'., has renewed its charter from a limited term to a per- 
il one and is desirous of having a ratification of a transfer 
of its franchise in this body, in the said rechartered organiza- 
tion ; 

'• Resolved, That the National Base Ball Club of Washington, 
D. C. as newly chartered be and is hereby made a full in. 
of the League with all the rights and privileges formerly held 
by the said National base Hall Club." 

The above preamble and resolution of the Washington Club 
was unanimously approved. 

Mr. Byrne pr< comsauniaMiiop from the business 

manager of the Sporting News in relation to advertising. 

After discussion, it was decided that the League has no 
jurisdiction over the advertising of individual clubs. 

The I'., idenl uas authorized in his discretion to loan the 
base ball and cricket effects of the late Harry Wright to the 



6o 



ANNUAL MEET1M 01 tONAL LKAGI I . 



University of Chicago and the Germantown Cricket Club, as 
per requests of Prof. A. A. Stagg and D. S. Newhall. 

The Telegraph Committee submitted their report, which, on 
motion, was received and laid upon the table, the Ban 
being satisfactory. 

The following preamble and resolution was offered by Mr. 
Hart: 

Whereas, The object of this organization as expressed in 
Paragraph 3, Section 2 of its Constitution is "to establish and 
regulate the Base Ball Championship of the United States," 
and as all contests for other objects are perfunctory and with- 
out the authority of the Constitution, it is 

■Resolved, That this organization will in no way, shape or 
manner authorize, approve or lend its moral support to any game 
or games between the clubs of its membership, except those 
provided for in the regularly adopted schedule. 

1 motion, the consideration of the above was postponed. 

The communication of the Sporting Life Publishing Company 
was referred to Messrs. Byrne and Rogers with full power to 

act. 

The Schedule Committee submitted his report, which was 
unanimously adopted. 

I 'ii motion, the next annual meeting will be held in Chi. 

lhe report of the Harry Wright Committee was accq 
and the Committee continued. 

' motion, the election of the fifth member of the National 

rred until the annual meeting. 
• motion, tl„.. Secretary was autl obtain designs 

for the annual souvenir passes for t 

The President was authorized and instructed to notify all 
managers of League Clubs that no passes given by visiting 
rs or managers would be recognized 
No further business appearing, on motion adjourned. 

v E. '. 

nUnt ,1/1,/ Secrtt 



: -*■ i <*i *•— «ii,¥'n>:<u.vv' —»v 






61 



Officers and Players. 

The following is an official lisl of the officers of the National 
League and American Association of Professional Base Ball 
Clubi ers and players of clubs, memb 'f, for 

the season of 1S0/1, so far as completed to March, 1S96. 

\. E. VOUNG, President and Secretary. 
Box 536, Washington, D. C. 

DIRECTORS. 
II. K. Von der Horst, James \. Hart, W, W. Kerr, 

A. 11. Soden, j. E. Wagner, T. Hunt Stucky. 

CHIC \(," BASE BALL CLUB, CHICAGO, ILL. 
James A. Hart, President, John A. Brown, Secretary. 

Suite 54, Hartford Building. 

Adrian C. Anson, Captain and Manager. 



A. Decker, 
W. F. Dahlen, 
Clark Griffith, 
M. J. Kittrid k 'c, 

I 
W. E. I'arrott. 



|osll Keillv, 

D. II. Rice, 
II. G. Truby, 
W. M. Thornton, 
II. T. Briggs, 
T. Don 



I no. Uolan, 
W. I.. Everett, 

Daniel Friend, 
\. Flynn, 
Monl McFarland, 
A. C. McBride. 

BOSTON BASE BALL ASSOCIATION, BOSTON, mass 
a. 11. Soden, President, J- B. Billings, Treasurer 

No. Il6 Water St BOX 175'- 

C \. Nichols, Thomas I. Tucker. I'. II. Dolan, 

Bannon, |. E. StiVetts, Penney, 

•'l.arles W. (ian/ell, R. I.. Lowe, W. J. Vcrrick, 

Long, fames Sullivan, Martin Bergen. 

.1- l:. Ryan, Hugh Duffy, 

tOKLYN B V.SE BALL CLUB 
,: - II. : President. 



BROOKLYN, N. V. 

A. A 1:1.1.1.. Tres 



:; I'ark. 



B. W. Abl 

Bonner, 

Wm. Kennedy, 

I I-. Mel 
H. I'. Payne, 



. Smith, 
f 0I1 11 Anderson, 
I. P. Daly, 
David I.. Foutz, 
Frank A. Burrell, 
Daniel Daub, 



BALTIMORE BASE BALL (III.. 
Edward 11 .m on, Pri iid< lit, II. '< 
Room 1, American Building. 



[ohn II. Grim, 

iChance, 
William Shindle, 
( . F. Dailey, 

rge ( v ). Shock. 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

Von der l' 1 

Treasurer. 



62 



OFFICERS .IMi II. A i 



\Y. Robinson, 
1 1 . [em 
W. Clark, 
I- McGraw, 
Jos. Kelly, 



Cbas. Esper, 
II. Reitz, 
\Vm. Keeler, 
J. B. Donnelly, 

.ray, 



I- . Bowerm 
A. Clarkson, 
|. [. Doyle, 
\\ . Gleason, ]r., 
0. II. Stocksdale. 



CLEVELAND BASE BALL COMPANY, CLEVELAND 
I. Iii'. II. Robison, J. Howard Ro 

lent. 






Frank Willson, 
C. I., (hil.ls. 

E. I. Chamberlain, 
P. Knell, 
E. J. McKean, 
I». I'. Young, 
R. J. Wallace, 



Trea 

rick, 
E. T. O'Meara, 
— . Shearan, 
J, II. Swain, 

",au, 
Oliver Telieau. 



II. C. lilake, 

l ireninger, 
J. < ('Connor, 
jam< 

James McAleer, 
i leo. Cuppy, 

k. C. Gi 

CINCINNATI BASE BALL < LI B, ( tNCINNATI, OHIO 
John T. Brush, Pre- d N. A. Lloyd, Treasurer, 

rl an<l I'luin St 1 -. 
I-'rank Dwver, . I, win, |. W. HoUiday, 

W. I'. Rhii i|. Peitz, W. A. !>avis, ' 

Geo. J. Smith, C. B. Miller, P. Mint, 

Wm - Schri |, .\. Mil W. I . Hoy. 

Win. Ewing, ). . j. Foreman, 

NEW York BASE BALL CLUB, NEW York. 
Redman, President. II. A. Bonnei 

39 and .41 Cortlandl St. 



3, 1 lavis, 

W. li. I , 

Van Ilaltren, 
E. Kami. ,n, 

I.. S. German, 

J. Meekin, 

las. Stafford, 

W. II. (lark, 

''lias. Farrell, 

1'ark A. \\ 



M. J. Tiernan, 
E. R. Dohney, 

C. 11. Ca 

I ..-ter, 

E. Ka 

Inn. 1 

''an, 

F. B. Butler, 

S. M. : 



Win. Clark, 
II. II. I> 
( lornelius Flynn, 
C. B. Mulligan, 
Fred Pfeffer, 

■ ■ 11 r , 
A. W. 

I ». W. Zearfoss, 
I . II. ( lonnaughton 



PHILADELPHIA BASE BALL < II I;. PHILADELPHIA 

A. I. Reach, , „,, , . 

J • > n n 1. Ri,i : urer 

1. 6th si. 

'j; *•■ ii| mi,]. 

W. W. Mailman. Arilmr Madi 

"• Mouth* William McGill. 



President 
am, 
John Clements, 
W. Carsey, 



OFFICERS VNI> l-l AYERS. 






]•:. [. ] >eli 
I. B. Taylor, 
M. < Irmly, 



Will. Illllrli, 

Elwood Eyler, 
Berl Inks,' 



W. M. Nash, 
Albert < >nli, 
Ceo. F. Whiti . 



CL1 I 



I 01 1S\ II. I. K BASE BALL 
Dr., Thom ^ I li'M sn i , 

President. 
Arthur Herman, 
Th os, Moi 

inningham, 
Win. Fuller, 
\V. I.. Hassamaer, 
M. McDermott, 
A. I). McFarland, 
i'ly, 

PITTSBURG BASE BALL ' I I D 
W. W. Kerr, President. 



W. C. Hill, 
Elmo Jacobs, 
Geo. F. M 
T. I.. Mi I 
Fred. < llausen, 
W. I tolmes, 
( )us Weyhing, 



LOUISVILLE, K\ 
B, Dheyfuss, 

iy and Treasurer 
II. C. Semple, 
F. C. Clark, 
E. F. I luuhin 
foe Wright, 
[.J. Warner, 
. I letter), 
John Leeson. 



C. J. Hei 
A ■ I • < 'llngman, [ai i >b btenzel, 
I. P. Bed l E. Smith, 

F, W. Ely, 
Killen, W. II. Merrill, 

P. |. Donovan, 
I .. Bierbauer, hard Padd 

i !> BASE BALL I LUB, ST. LOUIS, Ml . 
Chris Von der Ahe, President, 2809 Grand 
Henry II. In. 



PITTSBURG 
1 tySt. 
|. I). Foreman, 

1 Moran, 

fos. Sugden, 
Win. Smink, 
C. M. Ha 
C. M 



PA. 



Don-las. I . |. Miami, 

Hart, T. W. Parrott, 

W. Kissengen, John B. W 

Sam, Monte Cross, 

|. \. \l M. E. Murphy, 

M. A. Ki 

NATIONAL ^ VSHINGTON BASE BALL I LI B. 

: W. WAC G. II. SCHMELZ, 

Manager. 
J, 1 .ik, Tret 



I. II. McDo 
uinn, 
■|. 1 
R. Con 
VV. L, Donahue, 



>ey, 

I. II. I 

J. 1 rooks, 



[olin Mullarky, 
Albert 

"ii. 
A. C. Bosw ell, 
Ed. Cartwright, 

reville, 



J, N. Gilroy, 

William i 
W. I.. Lush, 

I. M (James, 

I-. Sheibeck, 



6 4 



OFFICIAL AVERAGES. 



LEAGUE OFFICIAL AVERAGES FOR 1895. 



The following tables are those compiled by Secretary N. E. 
Young "f the National League, and they present the best 
analysis of the season's play in the championship series. It 
will be seen that the batting record given below places Burkett, 
■ if Cleveland, in the lead, with a percentage of .423, which is a 
few points below that attained by Duffy in 1S94. Delehanty. 
Keeler, Thompson anil Hamilton follow in the order named 
with batting records from .393 10.399. Hofford, of Baltimore, 
leads the pitchers, with a percentage of games won of .810. 

Batting Record 

OF PLAYERS WHO HAVE TAKEN PART IN FIFTEEN OR MORE 
CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES — SEASON OF 1895. 



Name. 



Burkett 

Delehanty . . 

Keeler 

Thompson.. . 
Hamilton . . . 
Clements. . . . 

Turner 

Lange 

Jennings. . . . 

Stengel 

Holmes 

McGraw 

Kelly 

Rrodic 

Everett 

Tiernan 

Clarke 

Duffy 

Gumbcrt. . . . 
McKe.'in .... 

Sullivan 

Coolcy 

Parrott 

Truby 

Bannon 

Van Haitren 

Anson 

Zimmer 

Grady 

McCreery . . . 

Griffin 

Maguire 



Club 



Cleveland.. . . 
Philadelphia. 

Baltimore 

Philadelphia. 
Philadelphia. 
Philadelphia. 
Philadelphia. 

Chicago 

Baltimore. .. . 
Pittsburg .... 

Louisville 

Baltimore 

Baltimore 

Baltimore. .. . 

Chicago 

New 1 

ille. . . . 

Boston 

Brooklyn 

land. . . . 
Philadelphia. 

St. Louis 

Cincinnati 

Chicago 

Boston 

New York.... 

Chicago 

Cleveland 

Philadelphia. 

Louisville 

Brooklyn 

Washington. . 



is 1 
560 
538 
517 
334 
Si 111 
479 
528 



157 84 

510 I is 
538 84 
58 128 
128 
HI 
118 
21 
181 
75 
106 

17 
101 
112 

KS 

58 
81 
It 
188 



182 

133 539[ 01 



u 


a 











a 


h 


pa 


- 


fl. 


tJ 


285 


.433 


298 


111:; 




m 




210 


.3114 


857 


208 


.898 


■s;.<, 


126 


.889 


194 


81 


.3SK 


108 


186 


.888 


r.7 


204 


.886 


i>33 


200 


.3*1 


285 


80 


.3*2 


R2 


III 


,874 


171 


189 


.3Vii 


286 


198 


. 311.1 


241 


197 


.856 


240 


in* 


,854 


251 


1117 


.854 


241 


190 




255 


82 


.311 


46 


197 


..".II 


288 


127 


.310 


[42 


mi 


.lllil 


256 


88 


340 


nil 


40 




48 




,889 


285 


17! 


.888 


252 


mi 


.33* 


in* 


107 


.886 


III! 


■in 


.886 


48 


81 


.3.311 


42 


178 


.a35 


242 


t78 


.330 


258 



Ml 



91 
!28( 

6f 
81 
gl 

112! 

li 88 

9 61 

88 

8 3i> 
16 19 

0| 

1 11 in 
: in 15 

2 31 

6 10 

8 7 
112 33 

C 31 
1 18 us 

7 IS 
3 1 5 
2 2 
92T 
5)20 



uifs 
v. vr 1 1 nc; R words — Continued. 









6. Da 
Miller 

O. Tl:l 

Cartwi 

Connor 

Dowd 

■ 

Hawley 

Sheehnn 

Beckley 

Sclbach 

c. Ti b 

>n 

Ryan 

Kennedy .... 

LaChancc 

Griffith 

Long 

Donovan 

Ewing 

Doyle 

Hallman .... 

McGann 

Cliilds 

Foreman 

n 

-ii 

Cunningham 

ninn 

oyce 

"aughn 

Foutz 

McMahon.... 

Gray 

Holiiday 

Lowe 

Anderson 

Wil i 

Hai rington. . . 

Clarke 

Smith 

Nash 

Smith 

Anderson 

Taylor 

Ryan 

McPhce 

O'Connor 

Stafford 

Lucid 

Glasscock.... 

Preston 

McCarthy 



\ r!' 

I Cincinnati 

nil 

Washington 

Si. Lours 

St, Louis 

.ton... 

Pittsburg 

St. Louis 

Pittsburg 

Washington 

Cleveland 

Baltimore 

•■> 

lyn 

Brooklyn 

i 

Boston 

Pittsburg 

Cincinnati 

Mew Y rk 

Philadelphia 

rillc 

ind 

Cincinnati 

Pittsburg. 

inati 

Louisville 

St. Louis 

Washington 

Cincinnati 

Brooklyn 

ore .' . . . 

Cincinnati 

( in- linnati 



Washington 



< hi. 





Baltimore. 

i fti 

Boston 

Pittsburg 

Brooklyn 

ilphia. . . 



Cincinnati 

Cleveland 

New York 

Brooklyn and Philadelphia, 
Washington and Louisville 

Louisville 

Boston 



173 

It ti 
60S 
81 
I8E 
170 
' 
Ms 
82! 
His 
III 
184 
ii 
III 
640 
022 
139 
:llti 
089 
171 67 
[20 481 
25 93 
4.1 165 
I in 158 

111 HKI 



128 



Mil 
176 
91 
156 
181 
mi 

28 

in i 
or, 
171 
168 
[08 
H 

MH 
43 
174 
48 
178 
165 
139 
100 
170 
21 
Ill 
29 
48 
142 
ill 
170 
i II 
ui'j 
I!.', 
16 
ni 
:w 
12! 
88 
Hill 
00 
08 
160 
162 
in; 
128 
46 
57 
129 
99 
us; 
24 
62 
57 
I 132 



.mm 
..'Hill 

.11-11 
.as; 

. 821 

.824 
.824 
824 
.824 
.323 
.328 
.822 
,821 
.820 
819 
Hill 
,816 
,816 
.316 

;sir 
818 
HI 
312 
B10 
810 
810 
in in 
111 is 
305 
804 
802 
:ii 1 1 
801 
801 
801 
,299 
,299 
207 
297 
298 
290 
:;!«; 
296 
2110 
291 
293 
298 
.298 
,892 
,292 
291 



65 



X S3 

to oi 

84o 
7H5 
•I II 
4 68 



•1 36 
1 2 
3 
•I 
16 
6 



I 
5 

111 
10 
12 

28 

15 
2 

u 

8 



21 

(I 

2 


I i-i 

1 

8 

i 

61 

! 16 

"I 1 
16 :r, 

I 111 

■I 19 
3 



66 



OFFICIAL AVERAOKS. 



HATTING RECORDS — Continued. 



McAlecr 

Crooks 

Decker 

Lyons 

Miller 

Hemming. . . 

Meekin 

Schriver 

T. Daly 

Wright 

Brouti 

Peitz 

Grimm 

Boyd 

Stein 

Farrell 

Cuppy 

Reitz 

Getli; 

Carsey. .... 

Blake 

Sweeney 

Hogriever . . 

Shindle 

Collins 

Corcoran. . . . 

Cross 

Tenney 

Grenni 

Abbey 

Hoy , 

Dahle , 
Murphy 

Dwyer 

Luby 

Carey 

Donah i 

Mci iarr 





Bannon .... 

■ ■] 

Robin ■ 
Shoch 

O'Brien 

T red way 

\V. CI 

Clingman — 
Ely 

Warner 

Stuart 

S]»i--< 



Club. 



Cleveland 

Washington 

Chicago 

St. Louis 

St. Louis 

Baltimore 

New York 

New York 

Brooklyn 

Louisville 

Baltimore and Louisville. . 

St. Louis 

Brooklyn 

Washington 

Brooklyn 

Mew York 

nd 



irUIe 

lelphia 

Cleveland 

Louisville 

' Cincinnati 

lyn 

and Louisville 

Brooklyn 

Philadelphia 

Boston 

Cleveland 

Washington 

Cincinnati 

, 

at] 

i.iti 

Louisville , 

Baltimore 



ind , 

\''u- York ami ( incinnati . . 

Philadelphia 

New 5Torl« 

Baltimore 

Brooklyn , 

Washington and Louisville, 

Louisville 

Brooklyn 

New York 

Pittsburg i 

St. Louis 

Louisville 

Pittsburg 

Cincinnati and Louisville. 



181 509 

IB BS 
62 221 



75 in 
si 150 
9fi 1 18 
84 48 
10 22 

92 117 

■ 

ill 80 

Bfi 1 1 ( 
90 L06 






57 90 

10 28 

67 121 

Lfi SB 



89 

38 
9 
4 

is 

1 
B 

38 
B 
l 

[0 
9 

1 

u 

3 




88 
86 

6 
32 

8 

19 

if 

H ](> 

is g 

2 13 

i 

[0 19 

■ 



0FFICIA1 I 
BATTING KBCOKDS— Continued. 



67 



Name. 





Mcrritl 

iri — ■ . ■ 





lucr 







Maul 

< irnillS 

McGill 

( German 

K-itlT'-' g 

1 

Wilson 

Inks 

W. H. Clarke. 

Han 



iley 

Is. ... . ■ ■ 



Fuller 





Terry 

rig 

Knell 





Young 

Stivetts 

Murphy 





Mm' hi 

in 

It 

Shelbecl 

Sullivan 







Mi Dermoti - ■ ■ 
McDou 
Clarltson 



Club. 





i incinnati and Piti iui 

1 illc 

New York and Broo 

Pittsburg 



Philadelphia 

Baltimore and St. Louis. . 

! 

Mew York 



Philadelphia 

Washington 

Pittsburg 

Philadelphia 

New Yorl 



Chicago 

New York 

Louisville 

New Yorl 

Pittsburg 

St, Louis 

Brooklyn 

1 

Pittsburg. 



Cincinnati 

New York. 

St. Louis ^v W 

Louisville 



lie, PI il. 44 PI ... 
:ul & Louisville. . . 

lyn 

; >rc 

tad 

Cleveland 



Sfork 

t.Loul 

Balti re & St. Louis 

[o 

Washington 

St. I ,OUl* 

St. Louis 

Washington 

B 1 ' 

Baltimore 

St. Louis 

Chicago 

ille 



MMtimore & St. Louis 



•.-.'II 
-I.... 

318 
211 

■:ii 

•Jll 

•ill!) 

208 
208 
•;i 1. 
208 
190 
186 
1 32 
.170 
108 

.Ml 

156 
. 1.-, I 
.120 



27 

HI 
176 

Dl 
151 
158 

:;i 

.'!•> 

158 
53 

26 -1 
29 1 



1::,' 
67 

85 

:!•; 
20 
45 
41 ' 1 

131 
152 

43 

41 

28 

28 

IB 

82 

29 



88 


• • 


1. 


2 




'.• 


28 


:■ 


2H 


j 


85 


ii 


in 


1 


II 


g 


18 


1 


11 


1 


22 


1 


17 


2 


IS 


g 


1H 





SI 


H 


'. 


H 




:: 



8 

1 
.-. 
n 
1 
11 
8 

6 a 

8 

■•: 
8 
1 



1 

5 
6 

6 
8 

n 
1 

1 
ii 
ii 



T 



6S 



OFFICl \l. AVERAGES. 



Fielding Record, 1895. 

FIRST BASEMEN. 



O'Connor 

O. Tebeau .... 

Carey 

Anson 

\ Connor .... 
Bassamaer. 

f Cartwright. . 

(Weld 

1 LaChance .. 
G. Tebeau. . . . 

Spies 

W. Clark 

Beckley 

Ewing 

Tucker 

Boyle 

Doyle 

Brouthcrs 

Bannon 



Cl.U'Ji. 



Cleveland 

land 

Baltimore 

Chicago 

St. Louis ■■ 

Washington and St. Louil 

Washington 

nut 

Brooklyn 

Cleveland 

Cincinnati and Louisville 

New York 

Pittsburg 

tnati 

' 

Philadelphia 

New York . 

r< ■!:'' l 

Mew York. 



tea 

1129 
1172 

n 

285 



n 

K 
i-:: 
123 
104 

12l|l09T 

. 169 



108 
(53 

214 

Kirr 

948 
1161 
1241 

258 



161 164 






8 
18 11 

63 I 

98 
10 

ie 9 

II 5 
SI 
83|24 
88 \U> 

84 21 

II 10 



& 

(it 

.993 
.992 
990 
,989 

.I'M 
88 1 

set 

.1183 
988 



111 

UK) 
1258 
108 

812 
1209 

169 
1870 

1468 978 
1055 977 

1274 .1176 

646 .968 



ID BASEMEN. 



,owe 

Crooks 

Bierbauer. . 
Halhnan 

?uinn 
ruby 

Child* 

Harrington. 



Boston 

Washington. 
Pitt-.li 

lelphia. 

:is. . . . 

iile 

: vii . . . . 
Baltimore... . 
Cincinnati — 
Cleveland... . 



I 



2iii :;n; 
279 411 

IH1 138 

m an 

141 



721 
794 



.967 
.956 
.949 
.947 
.948 



750 .948 
782 .107 
269 .987 

112 .919 



591 
689 



917 



I IIIKH BA 1EMEN. 



Cross 

Collins 

Shindle 

i Greln 

) Nash 





Gray 

tan 

Reiti 



I Philadelphia 

and Louisville . . 

:i 

1 



I 

. Cleveland 

, Cincinnati 

. Pittsburg 

. 'Baltimore 



[24 








75 




80 


843 






II 


458 


II 




7 


69 






51 


: j 12 










108 130 as 


II 










1'is | |~ 


i ..; 


j: 



.Hi:-, 
.909 

.H'.IH 

.886 

.884 

.881 



OFFICIAL AVERAGES. 
THIRD BASEMEN — Continued. 



6 9 



Namb. 



McGraw. . 

1 Genins . 

Latham.. . 
Farrcll. . . . 
Everett . . . 



Mill, r 



Presi 

Samuels 

Bonner. 



Jennings... 
I Corcoran . 

1 Ely 

Smith 

Stunrl 

Fuller 

McKean 

I 

Rcilly 

Long 

Sheibeck . . . 

CrOSS 

Sullivan 

Shugart 

Coogan — 



Ha*.samaer. .. 

GrilTni 

Murphy 

I Shoch 

I Wright.... 

(Thompson.. 

■j Brorlic 

McAleer 

Kecler 

Holliday 

Donovan 

Shcehan 

Duffy 

Delehanty... 

Ticrnan 

Tcnney 

IKelU-v 

I Hogrtever . 

Brown 

Miller 



Club. 



Baltimore 

Pittsburg 

St. Louis 

Cincinnati 

Mew York 

Chicago 

Washington 

St. Loins 

Louisville 

St. Louis 

Baltimore and St. Louis. 





/' 










3 








E 





Ifi 


e 


ra_™ 





3 

a. 


< 


W 


£° 


'.1:1 


100 


28* 


16 


884 


US 


as 


41 


e 


7S 


88 


(it 


r,:i 


in 


180 


KIT 


12s 


90a 


IK 


874 


25 


29 


50 


12 


91 


ISO 


175 


364 


;■; 


511 


187 


187 


384 


n 


494 


DJ 


4H 


66 


■ 


187 


'.'1 


27 


41 


73 98 


ia 


22 


38 


ld| T4 


31 


IT 


■!i\ 


18 


01 



880 
,677 
.877 
.871 
,868 
859 
.852 
.832 
.788 
.743 
70S 



STOPS. 



Baltimore 

Brooklyn 

St. Louis 

Cincinnati 

Pittsburg 

New York 

: tnd : . 

1 Engt'n 



' 

Washington 

Pittsburg 

Philadelphia 

Louisville 

Washington 



126 
SOS 
247 
258 
86 
270 



256 48! 



si 

49 

SB! 



117 1 152 
267 827 
186 271 
184 253 

86l 50 





988 


l',ll 


8H1 


50 


712 


Si 


7fi8 


•.1 


107 


71 


882 


67 


766 


84 


HOI 


36 


2115 


17 


Hill 


*l> 


788 


80 


270 


76 


668 


i;i 


5IK 




500 


■ 


116 



,026 
.916 
.914 
.911 
.907 
.90S 
.899 
.898 
.892 



.874 

.741 






ind Louisville 

lyn 

New York 

it 

file 



Baltimore 

Cleveland 

tore 

oac] 

urg 

St. Louis 

Boston 

Philadelphia 

New York 



. >re. 

( Cincinnati ■ • ■ 

Washingt'n and Louisville 
Cincinnati 



2 

II 
2 
8 
6 
9 
II 
16 
11 

.'! 
10 

8 

20 
29 15 

8 I 

<;| 8 

11 12 
16 19 

■.—.'I 



,980 

.968 
.988 
.968 
.961 
.981 
.958 
.957 
.964 

.946 
.945 
.948 
.940 

.989 



r. 



70 



OFFICIAL AVERAGES. 



ouTFiKi.DKks — Continued* 



Name. 



Dowd 

Lange 

Hamilton 

\ Genins 

< Coolcy 

(Collins 

\ Gettinger ... 

ich 

Stenzel 

J Ryan 

i Burns 

Blake 





Burke 

Clark-: 

Van 1 1 

Prestuti 

Burkett 

Smith 

Bannon 

1 Foutz 

rthy. . . 



tu 

Bannon 

rson 

JHoy 

/ 1 readway. . . , 

r 

) Turner 



Sweeney 

Miller 

Boyd.. 



Club. 



St. Louis 



Philadelphia 

Pittsburg 

St. Louis 

Hostonand Louisville 

ille 

Washington .... 

Pittsburg 



New Vork and Br< > 

aid 

Washington 

New Y«rk and Cincinnati 

Louisville 

New York. . .' 

ille 

Mid 





lyn 



Louisville 

.ii'l .... 



Brooklyn 

Cincinnati 

Brooklyn 

Chicago 

Philadelphia 

I lie 

Louisville 

St. Louis 





1 1 20 

82 -.".i 

i. :, 
5 



■■>, 
»> 
SO 
Hi 

B 
12 
1 

815 1 1 
888 

46 

::; I 

82 

soa 

21 18 
211 



s 
.•i 1 1 

3 






K, 


117 8 


.-,:> 


mil 4 








811 8 


'.'! 




21 


2!l 8 




18 



881 

68 
139 

801 
192 
102 
1 IS 
26! 
840 
258 
104 

58 

■•:■•; 

i: 

66 

281 
144 
121 

III 
56 
84 
42 

241 



859 .919 



917 
915 

1115 
915 
,914 

nil 

.'.HI 
.'.HI 
.910 
.91 9 

905 
.899 
.699 
.897 
.898 
.891 

SSI I 

.806 
.686 
,888 
.879 
,878 
.877 
.875 

.868 
. 889 
.794 



HERS' ki " i 



Dailey 

j Robinson 
I Clements 

Ganzcl 

Zimmer. . . . 

Clarke 



Cm/b. 



I vn. . . 
Baltimore... 
Philadelphia 

N 

Cleveland. . . 
Baltimore. . . 



W ft, 



6 9 166 

7 II 871 
18 '.i 148 

9191417 
1". 91258 



%< 



.939 
.988 



OFFICIAL AVERAGES. 
CATCHERS' record — Continued. 



7i 



Namf. 



m 

I Kictredge 

\ Peitz 

I Tenney 

McGuire 

Farrell 

Murphy 

Warner 

Vaughn 

Miller 

Otten 

Buckley 

Wilson 

Spies. 



1" 
11 
12 
18 
14 
15 
16 
B 



I Merritt • 
i Bunslow. . 

Ryan 

Donohuc. . . 

Schriver. . ■ . 

Welch 

Moran 



Club. 



lyn 

Chicago 

its 



Washington 

New York 

Cincinnati 

i ille 

Cincinnati 

St. Louis 

St. Louis 

Philadelphia 

New York 

Cincinnati & Louisville... 

Pittsburg 

nnati & Pittsburg. . . 

Pittsburg 

Boston 

Chicago 

Philadelphia 

I tnd 

Neu' York 

Louisville 

Chicago 



| 
a 

C 

89 34: 
68 194 

!":.'. 

18 ill 
IK 41 
i;-; 258 
23 71 
6119! 

44 163 

28 75 
21' 151 
51 280 

4.". 179 





„: 














DO 


-: 




u 








:1 










~ 


H 





384 






III S'.l 


23 


650 



=-< 



.934 
.934 
.921 
.921 
.906 
.902 
.899 
.896 
.S9I 
,698 

,891 
,890 

.880 
.879 
.877 
,876 
,878 
,875 
.874 
HIJU 

859 
B50 
75S 

707 



PITCHERS' RECORD IN' ALPHABETICAL ORDER. 



Name. 



Ander 
Breitenstein.. 

Carsey 

Clarke 

Clarkson 

Cunningham. 

Cupny 



MoUn 

Dwyer 

Ehret 

Espcr 






Washington 

St. Louis 

Philadelphia 

New York 

St. Louis* Iialtim'rc 

Louisville 

Cleveland 

Brooklyn 

Boston... 

Cincinnati 

St. Louis 

Baltimore 



u u 
rt v. 



8.88 I 



5.86 

6.72 

5, B 

6.04 
5.8!) 
7.05 

6.17 

6. mi 

7.11'.' 

16 



.1126 
.268 
.818 
.386 
.806 
.809 

.381 
.835 
.800 
,889 

.270 



a 

69 

169 
li:; 
58 
84 
100 
93 
60 
71 
73 
87 
75 



= 5 

at 



81 .908 
[81 .900 
69 .800 

68 .Kill 

82 .805 

47 .8X2 
94 .881 

88 .891 
56 .898 

48 .902 
56 .772 
39 .8*9 



72 



OFFICIAL AVF.RAGF.S. 



PITCHF.R S' RECOR D — Contill lift/. 



Nami 



Club. 



Foreman. . . . 
Foreman . . . 

German 

Griffith 

Gumbert. . . . 

Hart 

Hawley 

Hoffer 

Hemming. . . 
Hutchison... 

Inks 

Kennedy. . . . 
Kisseng -r. . . 

Lucid 

Maul 

Meekin 

Mercer 

McDermott . 

McGill 

McMahon. . . 

Nichols 

Parrott 

Rhines 

Rusie 

Staley 

Stein 

Stivetts 

Stocksdale. . 
Sullivan. . . . 

Taylor 

Terry 

Wallace 

Weyhing. . . . 
Young 





Cincinnati 

New York 

Chicago 

Brooklyn 

Pittiburg 

Pittsburg 

Baltimore 

Baltimore 

Chicago 

Louisville 

Brooklyn 

Bslt'more& Si 1 .outs 
Brooklyn & Phila... 

Washington 

New York 

Washington 

Louisville 

Philadelphia 

Baltimore 



Cincinnati 

Cincinnati 

New York 

St. Louis 

Brooklyn 



Wash. & Boston 

Cleveland & Boston. 

Philadelphia 

Chicago 

Cleveland. 

Lou'vil! 

Cleveland 



5.19 I 

r.eos 
r.ooa 

8.98 1 

5.50 3, 
9.52 5 

4.18 1, 



6.29 
7.62 
'J.ihj 

->.'.)■ 
5.42 

6.25 
6.21 

8.78 

6.00 
6.11 

8.91 



.291 
.821 

.310 
.264 
.284 
.882 
.846 
.818 
.86! 
.886 
.808 
.800 
.2-,:: 

a la 

.300 

.328 
93 283 
.848 

.888 



876 

27 1 
[804 
288 






.848 



81 86 .771 

82 U' -I 

.861 

.813 
159 I!''.' .811 

84 1 2. 



A TESTIMONIAL TO PRESIDENT N. E. YOUNG 

At the annual Spring Meeting of the National League, held in New York 
Feb. 2ti, lSllfi, President Young was the recipient of a handsome silver Gor- 
ham service of 220 | ting $4,700, as a triluue for " Uncle Nick's " 

twenty-fifth anniversary of his connection with tiie national game. Presi- 
dent Byrne of the Brooklyn club introduced President Soden of the i 
club, who made the presentation speech. President Snden said : 

" Time, in ils onward march, brings to every permanent Organization some 
Important occasion, recalling some notable event that deserves especial in- 
tention. Such an eventful period has come to our association, and we are 
,;,led at this time to congratulate Mr. Young and celebrate with him 
the fact that for twenty-five consecutive years he has served professional 
base ball as ils valued secretary, its truthful historian and the trustworthy 
keeper of its records. 

" I remember, as it were yesterday, my first meeting with Secretary 
Young, and the warm grasp of his hand and his cordial words of welcome 
impressed me most favorably, and I am happy to state that nearly twenty 
years of continued association with him has confirmed the correctness of my 
first impressions and increased my estimate of his ability and worth. And, 
I presume, because of this long acquaintance with Mr. Young, I have been 
asked to make a brief address commemorative of the silver anniversary of 
Secretary Young's official connection with professional base ball. 

" What f am about to say 1 feel certain will voice the sentiments of ll.is 

organization, of which .Mr. V i i* now both Secretary and President, and 

will just as truly represent the feelings of hundreds of ball players and 
nd thousands of the general public, who are patrons of the 
national game, which Mr. Young has done so much to elevate and protect. 

" It is not my purpose to attempt any eulogy of Mr. Young or to endi 
to extol his many virtues. He has made his own record and no words of 
mine can add new lustre to the brilliancy of that record. Permit me, how- 
ever, f. state that in Mr. Young we have an accomplished gentleman, 

and affable, a faithful and conscientious official, a wise counselor, an 
able diplomat, an honest man and one of God's noblemen. To know Mr. 
Young is to hold him in high repute, and wherever he is known he stands 
forth a conspicuous example of honesty and integrity. 

"And now to our worthy Secretary, whom we delight to honor on this 
anniversary day, I have a few words of special import It gives me 
pleasurc, Mr. Young, in behalf of the Natio ad American Asso- 

tion of riase Ball Clubs, to ask you to accept this solid silver service and 
with it a burglar proof safe in which it may be securely kept, as an evidence 
of our high appreciation of your efficient efforts during the past twenty-five 
years to promote the best interests of base ball, and we ask you to accept 
these gifts also as a personal tribute of our great esteem and profound 
respect fer you as a gentl* 

'■ We unite in the sincere wish that for many years you may look back 
upon this occasion with pleasurable emotions, and that each time you make 
use of this service it may reaffirm to you our lasting confidence and endur- 
ing friendship." 



T 





"5 

C O 

03 


May 
18, 19.20 

July 
9, 10, 11 


35 2 
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■ 


May 

4, 5,' 6 

July 

90,81,28 


a 8 

s s^s 


May 

14.1S, 16 

July 




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OFPKX Of PMSIDWff 

NATIONAL LEAGUE and AMERICAN ASSOCIATION 



PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS. 



JU X""e i 



W; 



< Z%a3&Ku£7K2)c £3&a* £f *&/ 



* 9 



vaJ&ZifC 



y«CA«/ 



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ouut/ /tu> f>&>27feJi<Ann/ /ia»J A<t.&vryi/w>*w 








5PALDING'S 
Trade-Mark 

Base Balls. 

The Spalding League Ball, 
adopted by the National League 
and American Association of 

Professional I Clubs. 

Warm East a full game 

without ripping or losing its 
elasticity or shape. 



Lack. 
The Spalding Official League P.all....$ | .50 
The Spalding Official Boys' League 

Ball, fur Junior Clubs | .00 

" Double Seam*' Jail, double stitched 

and warranted to last a full game.. | .50 
Wright an i DUson's League Ball, 
regulation size and weight and war- 
ranted to last a full game 1 .00 

"Professional" Ball, regulxtion size 

and weight, war"a»tcd a 1 

ball I.OO 

" Hoys' Professional,' same as No. 2, 

in boys* size 50 

*' Amateur" Ball, regul • 

hide cover 75 

"King of the Diamond," regulation 

size and well mode .50 

■rite," regulation size, 

horschide cover 25 

ue Junior," slightly under 

regulation size, hoi ' 25 

11 Bouno ;, ■ v lively and high 

bounding ball .25 

" VI tor" Ball, regulation size .20 

' Amateur" Ball, little under 

regulation size I 5 

(AH of above in separate box and sealed.) 

c< ,\iiu.ktl; CATAL< x*.i:p; kwkk. 

A. Q. SPALblNQ £r BR05., 

New York. Chicago. Philadelphia. 





No 
No 

No 

No 

No 

No 
No 

1 No 
i No 

No 

1 No 
r ' No 


1. 
IB. 

O. 


aJilkllM ' 

mm 


|UM«KS~&MHBi 




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2. 


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3. 




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7. 




7B. 


\KK\mwmwt 


1 1. 

6. 

14. 



n 








No. 3/0. 



Ko. OX. 










No. B, SpsM 

quality ;is No 



Spalding's Hasks. 

Clack Enameled Sun Protecting Mask. 

Patented. 

This is not only the "Highest 
Quality" Mask made by us, hut 
has also our patent sunshade, 
which is formed by a piece of 
molded leather securely fastened 
to top, forming a perfect chade to the eye without ob- 
structing the viVw or materially increasing the v 
of the mask. Made of best soft annealed steel wire, 
extra heavy and black enameled, thus further prevent- 
ing the reflection of li^ht. The mask throughout is 
constructed of the very best material and has been 
highly endorsed by the leading catchers.. Each, S5.00 

Spalding's Black Enameled Masks. 

No. 3Q. Our Patent Neck Protecting Mask has an 
extension at bottom giving absolute protection to the 
neck, without interfering in the least with the move- 
ments ot the head. The wire is of best annealed steel, 
is extra heavy and covered with black enamel to pre- 
vent the reflection of light. The padding is filled with 
goat hair and faced with finest imported dogskin, 
i h, being impervious to perspiration, always re- 
mains soft and pleasant to the face Each, $3.50 

No. JVO. Special League Mask, made of extra heavy 

iec. wire, black enameled, the 
j.f' li goat hair and covered with finest 

imported dogskin Kadi, $3.00 

No. OX. Regulation League Mask, made of heavy soft 
i.ieled, the padding well 
stuffed and faced with specially tanned horsehide. War- 
ranted first-class and reliable in every particular. 

Each,$2,50 

Regulation League Masks. 

No. O, This mask is of same style and quality as our 
k, except that the soft annealed steel wire 

is bright finished. The padding is well stuffed and 
faced with specially tanned fa h, $2.00 

Spalding's Amateur Masks. 

No. A* Spalding's Amateur Mask, made in same size 
and general style as our League masks, but of lighter 
soft ' I ' , trongfy con- 

structed and wan try safe* ..Each, $ f .50 

ng's Amateur Boys' Mask, made in same style and 

A mask, only smaller in i I.i< h, $ f .00 
-COMPLETE CATALOGUE FREE. ft 



. A. Q. SPALDING & BROS., 
NEW YORK. CHICAGO. PHILADELPHIA. 



SPALDING'S TRADE MARK BATS. 




Men's Model, made of finest selected 
MfUtiK timber, oil finish, and in three approved Each. 
|MFV models, A, B and C. Each bat in sep- 
„«m.«i "^1 »""-• !>«. Highest Quality. ........ $ I .OO 

Boys' Model, samequality and finish, 
in three patterns, Aj B and ( | ,0C> 

No. 3/0. Each 

No. 3/0. Spalding's Special Black End League Players' Wagon 

Tongue Ash Bat, patent rough handle S I .OO 

No-O'X. Spalding's Special Black End Axletree Bat, fine straight 

grained ash ... ■ .. ^O 

No. 2/X. Spalding's Black End Antique Finish Bat, extra quality 

Ash..." .28 

No. 4. Spalding's Black End Willow Bat, highly polished and 
very light .50 

Spalding's Trade-Mark Boys' Bats. 

No. OXB. Spalding's Special Black End Axletree Boys' Bat; Each. 

length, 30 and 32 inches $0.25 

No. 56. Spalding's Black End Youths' Maple Bat, stained and 

polished, gilt stripes •••• .10 

No. 53. Spalding's Black End Youths' Maple Bat, polished, gilt 

stripes .10 

No. 54. Spaldin & Boys' Maple Bat, black stripes, 36 

t028inchcs .05 

Our complete Catalogue of " Spring and Summer Sports," handsomely 

illustrated, and containing every requisite for athletic 

sports, mailed free to any address. 



A. G. SFALDING & BROS., 

NEW YORK. CHICAGO. PHILADELPHIA. 



Spalding's Catchers' Mits. 



V 




The" Morrill." 







■*<>. 7/0. 




A. G. 

New York. 



s Baseman's Mit. 

(This Mit bearing 
the Trade Mark 
| of our Highest 
Quality i 
sufficient guarantee that it is the most perfect 
glove in all us details that our past experience 
enables us to produce. Thcleathcris of the finest* 
quality adapted for that purpose, the padding and 
workmanship of the very best, ami the additional 
feature of lace hack make it — as wc intend it shall be 
— the" Perfection" of Catchers' Mits. Made in 
Rights and Lefts Each, $7.50 

The "norriH" Mit is after the design of the well- 
known ball player, John Morrill, and has become 
very popular. It is made throughout of finest 
quality drab buckskin, is very heavily padded with 
the softest felt, and thumb laced to palm to prevent 
ripping. An extremely easy-fitting mit. Made in 
Rights and Lefts. Not laced back. Each, $6.00 

No. 5/0. Spalding's League Mit is made through- 
out of specially tanned and selected hogskin, mak- 
ing a strong and durable mil, at the same time 
''.pliable. It has our patent Lace 
and heavily padded. Made in Rights and 
Lefts Each, $5.0O 

Ho. O. The Spalding Mit, face, sides and finger- 
piece are made of velvet tanned deerskin, and the 
back of fine hogskin, making an exceedingly easy- 
fitting and durable mit. It has our pate; 

.uid well padded. Made in Rights and Lefts. 
Each, $3.0O 

fo. OX. Spalding's "Decker Patent "Mit is made 
exactly the same as our No. Mit, with the addi- 
tion of a heavy piece of sole leather on hack for 
extra protection to the hand and fingers, as shown 
incut. Ithasas wellthepatenl , and is 

extremely well padded. Made in Rights and 
Lefts Kach, $3.50 

No. A. Spaldi teur Mit is made of extra 

1 ation prool ani 
tremefy tough and durable, li has on. 

Bat k, rcinfon cd .0 thumb and well made and 
padded. Made in Rights andLel S2.00 

No. 3. The Spalding Practice Mit, the face and 
finger-piece 01 our Practice Mit are made of light 
brown tanned suede leather, the edge strip and 
back of ecru tanned suede. It has our patent 
Lace Back, reinforced .it thumb mid substantially 
padded. Made in Rights and Left*. Each, $1.00 

SPALDING & BROS., 

Chicago. Philadelphia. 



Spalding's Boys' Catchers' Hits. 

No. OXB. . Spalding's •'Decker Patent" Boys* 
tee. edge strip and finger-piece made 
of velvet tanned deerskin, the back of fine hogskin. 
very soft and peis; f. Thcheavy piece 
vt sole leather on back affords extra protection 
to handand fingers. It has the patent Lace Back 
and is extra well padded. Made in Rights and 
Lefts Each, $2.0O 

No. 2, Spalding 1 * Boys' Mit, face and finder-piece 
of nut made of dark tanned 1< ither« theoack and 
t strip of light tanned asbestos buck. It has 
our patent Lace Back, well padded and finished 
and reinforcci at thumb. Made in Rights and 
Lefts and little larger in size than our i 
Boys' Mils Each, $ | .50 

No. 4. Spalding's Boys' Mit, front and finger-piece 
of this mltare made of light brown tanned suede 
leather, the I ; strip ecru tanned. It is 
extremely veil padded and nicely finished through- 
out, and has our patent Lace Back. Made in 
Rights and Lefts Each, 50C. 

No. 5, Spalding's Boys* Mit, front and hack made 

of ecru tanned leather, the edge strip of lighter 

tanned leather. Well made throughout, heavily 

padded and superior to any Boys' JVlit ever offered 

No. 5. at the price Each, 25C. 

Spalding's Basemen's Mite 

Basemen's Mit, made 

of fine selected and 

specially tanned 

calfskin, extremely 

well made through- 

' and padded to 

meet the special requirements of a Baseman's Mit. 

If nicely to the conformation of the 

hand without undue straining, and the addition of 

our patent Lace Hack and "Highest Quality" 

Trade Mark is a sufficient guarantee of its quality 

and merits. Made in Rights and Lefts, 

u>. J Eac . h - 54.00 

Mit, made of the very 







' I ; 'd Softest light 
tanned buckskin; the 
thumb and at wrist is 



No. 3X. 

mumoandat wrist is 

extra well padded 

with the h ighest 

quality felt, nuKIngll a very iafe ami easy fitting 

mbined with strength and durability. The 

mit throughout is of the best workmanship, as in- 
dicated by our "H ility" Trade Mark. 
No. 4X. Made in Rights and Lefts Each, S3.CO 

COMPLETE CATALOGUE FREE. 

A. ©• SPALDING & BROS., 

New York. Chicago. Philadelphia. 




No.4X. 



Spalding's 
Basemen's and Infielders' flits. 



No. 4X. Spalding's Basemen and Infielders' Mit is 
constructed throughout of velvet tanned deerskin 
and edges morocco bound. It is well padded with 
fine felt and carefully sewed and finished. Made in 
Rights and Lefts Each, $2.00 

No. 5X. Spalding's Basemen and Infielders' Mit, 
made of good Quality suede leather, nicely padded 
and constructed throughout in a most substantial 
manner, making an exceedingly good mit at 
lar price. Made in Rights and Lefts. Each, $ | .OO 

Boys' 
Basemen's and Infielders' Mit, 

No. 6X. Spalding's Boys' Basemen's Mit is made 

bout of a good quality leather. It is well 

padded and makes a good and substantial mit for 

boys. Made in Rights and Lefts Each, 50c. 

Infielders' Glove. 

Infielders' (Hove is made 
| throughout of selected 
' velvet tanned buckskin, 
i lined and correctly pad- 
ded with unesi felt. It 
fits the hand perfectly and our Trade Mark " High- 
est Quality " is a guarantee that the glove is perfect 
in all its details. Made in Rights and Lefts. 

Each, $3.00 

Infielders' Gloves. 

No. X. Spalding's Infielders' Glove, made of suede 
leather, lined and padded with felt and carefully 
put together. Made in Rights add Lefts. 




No. 6X. 




No.2X. 



No. X. 



Each, $|.50 
No. |5, Spalding's Men's Infielders' Glove, all 
leather ; a substantial glove at a popular pi 

Each, $|,00 

Boys' Infielders' Glove. 

No. 13. Spalding's Boys' Infielders' Glove, quality 
and style as our No. X, in boys' sizes. 

Each, $ I .OO 



COMPLETE CATALOCUE FREE. 



A. Q. Spalding & Bros., 

New York. Chicago. Philadelphia. 



Athletic Uniforms 



.AND. 



Wearing Apparel for AH Sports. 



SPORTSMEN'S WEAR.^ 




BROOKLYN FACTORY. 

Bicycle Suits, Sweaters, Tennis Suits, Jerseys, Athletic Shoes, Knee 

Pants, College and Full Tights, Outing Caps, 

Ladies' and Gentlemen's Belts. 

In Cotton, Worsted, Silk and Leather. 

Barnard's Celebrated A-l Shooting Coat, 8hooting Trousers, Shooting 

Hats and Caps, Gun Cases, Cartridge Belts, Revolver Holsters, 

and an Important Line cf Leggings. 

HANUFACTURED BY 

GEO. BARNARD & CO., 

Sixth Ave. and Pacific St.. 199=20! Madison Street, 



BROOKLYN. 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



SELLING AGENTS 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 

New York. Chicago. Philadelphia 




Spalding's 
Base Ball Uniforms. 



Including Shirt, 
Stockings. 

No. O. 



Complete. 

Padded Pants, Cap, Belt and 



Uniform $14.75 

| , " University " Uniform | | .25 

2. " Interscholastic " Uniform 9.00 

No. 3. " Club Special " Uuiform 6.25 

No. 4. "Amateur Special" Uniform 4 50 

Our line of flannels for Base Ball Uniforms consists of the best qualities 
in their respective grades and the most desirable colors for Rase Ball 
Uniforms. Each grade is kept up to the highest point of excellence and 
quality improved wherever possible every season. Owincj to the heavy 
weight flannels used in our Nos. and 1 Uniforms, we have found it de- 
sirable, after many years of experience, to use a little lighter weight material 
for the shirts; this makes them more comfortable, much cooler, and wear 
just :is well ai the heavier weight. Tf, however, you prefer the heavier 
goods for the shirts, they will be supplied at same price, but only when 
specially ordered. 



Spalding's Base Ball Shirts. 



In Lace or Button Front. Each. 

H"$f Shirt, any style $5.50 




The " University " Shirt, any style 4.50 

" Interscholastic" Shirt, any style 3.75 

" Club Special " Shirt, any style 2.50 

"Amateur Special " Shirt, any style | .85 

Price includes Lettering on Shirts. 



Spalding's Base Ball Pants. 

In Tape "r Elastic Bottom. All Padded 

Pants 



Pair. 

Ko.O. <§JP%!&% Pants S6.00 

No. I, "L'n i'.mts 4.50 

No. 2. " Interscholastic " Pants 3.50 

No. 3. " Club Special " Pants 2.50 

JJo. 4. "Amateur Special" Pants 1.75 

COMPLETE CATALOOUE FREE. 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 



New York. 



Chicago. 
Philadelphia. 




No. 2/0. 

Our" Highest Quality " Base Ball Shoe is hand-made through- 
out, and of specially sele her. Extreme care 

will he taken in their gel " '■"", and no pains or ex- 

Ki use will be spared in making this shoe not only of the very 
it in quality but a perfect i. The plates 

exclusively, for this slice are of the finest hand-forged 
rod hrmly riveted to heel and sole. 

No. 20. IVr pair, $7.50 
UNIVERSITY. . . 

Made of the finest kangaroo calf, hand-sewed and extreme- 
ly well made throughout. Hand forged steel plates securely 
riveted to heel and sole. 

No. 31. Per pair, $7.50 

CLUB SPECIAI 

Made of carefully selected satin calfskin, machine sewed, v-ry 
tantially constructed and a first-class shoe in every par- 
ticular. Steel plates riveted to heel and b i 

No. 33. Per pair, $5.00 
AMATEUR SPECIAL. . . 

Madeofgoi ilfsktn, machine sewed. A serviceable 

and durable shoe, and one we can specially recommend. 
Plates riveted to heel and Bole. 

No. 35. Per pair, $3.00 
COMPLETE CATALOCUE FREE. 

A G. SPALDING & BROS., 



NEW YORK. 



CHICAGO. 



PHILADELPHIA. 




Base Ball Caps. 

Chicago, College, Boston and Uniyersity ityle*. 

Each. 

No. O quality, best flannel $| .00 

No. | quality, lighter flannel ,75 

No. 2 quality, good flannel (J5 

No. 3 quality, ordinary flannel 50 

No. 4 quality, light flannel ,40 

Chicago Style, made in 0, 1st, 2d and 3d 

qualities. 

. Style, made in all qualities, 
a Style, made 111 0, 1st, ad and 3d 
qualities. 
University Style, made in and 1st qualities 
Boston Style. only. 





No. 4T. 




No. 23. 



Base Ball Belts. 



Worsted Web Belts. 

In all colors. 

No. 3/0. Special League Belt, Worsted 
Web, a^ inches wide, leather lined, largo 
nickel-plated buckle Each, 75c. 

No. 2/0- Leapie Belt, WomedWeb, 8$« 

inches wide, large nickel-plated buckle, 
• 50c. 

No. 2. Worsted Web Belt, VA inches wide, 
double strap, leather covered buckles, 

Each, 50c. 

No. 47. Worsted Web Belt, 2J4 inches 

wide, single strap, leather covered buckle. 

Each, 50c. 

Cotton Web Belts. 

Colors : Red, Navy, White, Maroon and 
Stripes. 

No. 23. Cotton Web Belt, 2% inches 
wide, double strap, nickel buckles. 

Each, 25c. 

No. 4, Cotton Web Belt, 2>f inches, 

leather mounted, single strap and buckle, 

Each, |5C. 



Complete Catalogue Free. 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 

NEW YORK. CHICAGO. PHILADELPHIA. 



■1"^^^" 



^1 





Spalding's Inflated Body Protector. 

We are now the sole manufacturers of the Gray Patent 
Protectors, the only practical device for the protection 
of catchers and umpires. They are made of the best 
rubber, inflated with air, light and pliable, and do not in- 
terfere with the movements of the wearer under any con- 
ditions. When not in use the air may be let out and the 
Protector rolled in a very small space. We have added 
this season a Hoys' Protector to the line, which is equal 
in quality to the other styles, only smaller in si/c. 

Each. 

No. O. league Catchers' Protector $ | O.OO 

No. I, Amateur " " 6.00 

No. 2. Boys' " " 5,00 

No. o. Spalding's 

Special League Shoe Plates. 

Patented. 
Our Special League Plates are made of the finest tem- 
pered steel and t the strength increased almost fourfold 
without increasing weight by our patent reinforced brace, 
which is formed as shown ^ln cut by splitting the metal 
at each corner and depressing the centre, thus forming a 
brace at each side. 

No. O. Spalding's Special Hand Forged Steel Pair 
M\k Toe Plates $0.50 

iX ^3 No. 2-0. Spalding'sSpccialllaudForgedSteel 

^r-pvjP' HeelFlates rq 

Per dozen pairs, $5.00 

Professional Shoe Plates. 

No. |, Spalding's Professional Toe riates, best 

quality stoel on 

N >. I H. Spalding's Professional Heel Plates, 

best quality steel . OK 

Per dozen pairs, $2.50 

Amateur Shoe Plates. i 

oA N'o. 2. Spalding's Amateur Shoe Plates, fine 

"2~ «e« in 

Per dozen pairs, $ | .OO 

Pitchers' Toe Plates. 

Worn on toe of shoe and made for left or right 
A valuable assistant in pitching. 

No. A. Aluminum Toe Plate Fach.goc. 

No. B. ' I Plate " 25c. 

COMPLETE CATALOQUE FREE. - 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 

NEW YORK. CHICAGO, PHILADELPHIA. 







t 



SPALDJNG'S BASES— Three Bases to a Set. 

Ho. O. League Club Bases, extra quality can- Set. 
■raps and spil .. -$7,50 

| . Canvas Ba , not 

No. 0. quilted, straps and spikes, complete 5.00 

2. ( anvas Bases, ordinary quality, with 

.complete 4.00 

Home Plates arc not Included in abovi 

Spalding's Home Plates 

I , R i ibet 1 1 ■ = ' ' ' '■ te $7.50 

'v.. 2. M ility 2.00 

Spalding's Pitcher's Box Plates. 

in accordance with National League re 
tions and of extra quality white rubber. Complete with 
pins. 
No. 3. Spalding's Pitcher's IioxPlates $5.00 



No. 1. 

Iff 






Spalding's Club Bags. 



No. 2. Each. 

No. O. League Club Bag, sole leather, for 18 bat« $15. OO 

No. |. Cam 5.00 

No. 2. Canvas Club Bag, leather ends, for IS bats 4.00 

Individual Bags. 

.\.'. OS. 

N '. Ol. ,IS S4.00 

No. 02. 1 .50 

No. 03. aG " f .OO 

Athletes' Uniform Bag. 

.^■ti I ' ' "thcr Uniforms, 

II. and will ii I soil game. 

1 . Each, $2.50 

2. " 5.00 

Complete Catalogue Free. 






A. G. Spalding & Bros., fig 



New York, 



Iphia. 



i 



■ 




^M^S^JrM